2 DAY CONFERENCE

YOW! Connected 2016

Wednesday, 5th - Thursday, 6th October in Melbourne

33 experts spoke.
Overview

YOW! Connected is a two day Conference exploring the world of Mobile development and the Internet of Things (IoT).

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Programme

IoT for Slackers – Build Connected Devices with NodeMCU

Learn how to integrate connected devices into your business systems. Slack is a messaging platform with a robust add-on ecosystem, and supports both channel-based communications and direct messaging. NodeMCU is a Lua-based reactive programming environment (inspired by NodeJS) for the popular Espressif ESP8266 WiFi-enabled micro controller. This presentation will introduce each of the tools and then present several examples of using the NodeMCU IoT platform and Slack’s third party hooks to have physical computing devices communicate with humans via your Slack chat channels. The examples are contrived for simplicity, but have been developed in response to needs of an actual office environment.

You will learn what is possible with incredibly inexpensive IoT devices, what hardware you will need to get started, and how to configure Slack to permit interoperation with your device(s).



Christopher Biggs

Director
Accelerando Consulting


Bringing Virtual Reality to the Web in 2016

Despite a lot of hype this year, virtual reality is still unexplored and uncharted territory for many developers. The mobile web brings an easy way to create VR experiences for the masses without requiring them to download yet another app. WebVR has made leaps and bounds throughout 2015, with a range of new frameworks out there that make building WebVR experiences incredibly straightforward and cross-platform. In this talk, Patrick, the founder of DevDiner.com, will discuss the history of WebVR and then look at frameworks such as A-Frame, Primrose and Google’s VR View, and the strengths of each option compared to building experiences using Three.js or WebGL alone. He’ll also cover what WebVR is capable of and its current limitations on the different platforms to date — including Google Cardboard, Samsung Gear VR, Oculus Rift, HTC Vive and PlayStation VR.



Patrick Catanzariti

Founder
Dev Diner


A Type is Worth a Thousand Tests

One of the biggest changes in the transition from Objective-C to Swift is the new type system. This change is at the heart of Swift’s language design, from optionals over value types to constrained generics, and to truly understand the language, a thorough understanding of its type system is indispensable.

In this talk, I will explain the advantages of Swift’s strong commitment to a sophisticated type system. I will illustrate the impact on language and program design through a series of examples, drawn from my experience of developing one of the first Swift-based applications published in the Mac App Store and illustrated by walking through key design issues in a simple iOS app. I will discuss why type-driven design benefits from functional programming principles, and also, how it allows us to write less tests without a loss of confidence in our code.



Manuel Chakravarty

Lambda Scientist
Tweag I/O & IOHK


Enhancing Mobile Web Applications with Device APIs

With more and more users browsing the web on mobile devices, the web community now largely understands how important it is to design and implement our sites with the assumption that it will be viewed on a small screen.

Responsive web design is only one piece of the puzzle, however. A mobile device is more than just a smaller viewport. The technology available to your average mobile device varies considerably to the average desktop or laptop computer.

In this session, I will show how developers can enhance their web applications to take advantage of hardware features via device APIs, without sacrificing the overall experience for users accessing the application from non-mobile devices.



Jessica Claire Edwards

Front End Developer
Holler


IoT Medical Application: A Bluetooth Controlled DC and Radio Frequency Ablation System for Cancer Treatment

Medical Researchers have made measurements suggesting that application of a Direct Current (DC) voltage prior to and/or during the Radio Frequency Ablation of cancerous tissue can improve the efficiency of the ablation process, resulting in larger areas of ablation than can otherwise be achieved.

A prototype system, consisting of a software-programmable DC power supply incorporating sensors for measurement of Voltage, Current, Power, Impedance and Temperature as well as a control port for controlling a commercial Radio Frequency Ablation System (in this case, a Boston Scientific RF3000) has been built and demonstrated to provide a tool for further research and hopefully in the longer term, equipment useful in clinical situations.

The system is interfaced via a Bluetooth link to an Android or IOS mobile phone or tablet which runs an App that controls and monitors the ablation process. The App can program ablation sequences as a series of steps that define a ””cooking profile”” and continuously monitor and record the measurement parameters. Sequence commands take the form of: ””Apply ramped DC power from 50mW to 100mW over the first 5 minutes, then continue this while further applying an RF Power of 40W for another 5 minutes”“. If measured parameters extend past pre-defined limits, the ablation is cancelled for safety concerns.Data logs (and corresponding ablation sequences) can be saved directly from the phone/tablet to cloud-based storage for further analysis. The system is capable of recording in a matter of minutes what researchers have previously spent years investigating.

This development shows the potential of IoT connectivity and how taking advantage of existing infrastructure such as phones, tablets and the internet can drastically reduce the cost of development of sophisticated systems, because the display, user interface, communications infrastructure and computing platform are already. A relatively small investment in hardware and software can result in powerful connected equipment at a low cost.



Robert Clarke

Managing Director
RADLogic Pty Ltd


How to Create Compelling Tests

How do you create compelling tests? In this talk, Sam Connelly will go through her risk based framework that she developed to help her team create UI automation tests that matter. This approach can also be used for manual testing, generating explorative testing ideas and communicating flows & risks to people outside of your team. We will cover:

  • break an app into flows
  • map flows to risk board
  • break a flow into a test
  • create quick and dirty automation testing

You will learn how to have a risk based approach towards your test coverage and learn how to use a whiteboard and sticky notes to communicate testing ideas.



Sam Connelly

Product Risk Identifier
Tyro


The Innovator’s Stopwatch: How to Know when to Do What you Have to Do

Those who know what the future brings we call futurists. Those who know when one thing will happen we call billionaires. Entrepreneurs know this and cite timing issues are the primary causes for their success and failure. How do you calibrate your temporal senses? How can you know when to hold them and when to fold them? It turns out that we can learn from history if we know of a theory of industry development. This is a presentation of data and the patterns that support this theory.



Horace Dediu

Named the “King of Apple Analysts” by Fortune/CNN, he appears frequently on Bloomberg TV and BNN. He is also a member of the Forum for Growth and Innovation at Harvard Business School.


Tools of the Trade

Android Studio has a ton of options that can help developers when debugging their applications. This talk aims to demonstrate how to make the most of these features to maximize developers’ debugging efficiency.

This talk will go through the options available for debugging applications on the IntelliJ platform in general, and the Android Studio IDE in particular. Code samples, shortcut keys, and various options and set ups will be shown throughout.



Zarah Dominguez

Android Developer
domain.com.au


Beyond the Glamour – Building Supportable Mobile Apps

Everybody loves building and shipping apps! It is exciting. However, once the thrill of releasing has died down, the cold hard reality of providing ongoing support for these apps kicks in.

Aimed squarely at developers, tech leads and operations teams, you’ll be presented with some of the common pitfalls that are encountered post go-live, and explore some techniques (both technical and operational) that can be used pre-emptively to make your developers’ and support teams’ lives easier.

Broadly speaking, the presentation will be broken into 5 sections:

  • Architecture/Design – A number of architectural and design patterns that can be used to set your project up for success in the long term.
  • Development Practices – You’ll learn about some development practices that will assist developers and QA testers to have a predictable and reproducible process.
  • Production Support – What information do 1st/2nd/3rd level support teams need to do their job properly? Some common challenges will be presented alongside some battle-tested solutions.
  • Changing App Behaviour – Updating apps’ behaviour remotely is de rigueur in today’s mobile world. A number of techniques will be described that can be used to change the behaviour of apps once they have been released into the wild.
  • Discovering Problems Before Your Users – Sounds like nirvana, doesn’t it? There are a number of tools at your disposal and some elemental use cases will be outlined.


Craig Edwards

Head
Mobile at Bilue


AltConf – Behind the Scenes of Building a Community

As one of the founders of AltConf, I’ve had a unique view on the biggest week of the year for iOS and macOS developers, WWDC. AltConf has grown from a small seed to one of the biggest Apple developer conferences in the world, and a focal point for developers, designers and everyone in the community. We’ve changed over time, but always put the community at the heart of what we do and why we do it.

Join me to hear the origin story of AltConf, how we’ve evolved over the years, as well as the inside stories of our journey, and how we deal with the public pressure and high expectations.



Rob Elkin

CTO
busuu


7 Easy UX Secrets that Every Mobile Developer will Want to Know

Ephox’s rich text editors, TinyMCE and Textbox.io are two of the most complex and widely used JavaScript applications in the world: around 10 million people use these full-featured textediors every day. Last year, the team at Ephox took on the huge task of porting the 1500 module, shortcut-key driven, keyboard and mouse intensive application from desktop to mobile.

In this example-packed presentation, we share the experiences of our epic journey, the challenges faced, and the surprises that blindsided us. If you are planning to transition your own application from desktop to mobile, or create a new responsive web app, our 7 UX Secrets may just save you months of effort (and preserve your sanity!).



Damien Fitzpatrick

Senior Director
Products at Ephox


Microservices and IoT: A Perfect Match

Microservices always sound nice and neat, but it can be all too easy to end up building what amounts to a distributed monolith instead. Luckily streaming data (such as that from IoT devices) lends itself well to a style of architecture that realises the benefits of microservices, while avoiding many of the difficulties and pitfalls. In this talk I will describe such an architecture developed at Urbanise using Amazon Kinesis and idempotent, horizontally scalable, fault tolerant, microservices for processing of sensor data.



Perryn Fowler

Perryn is a Software Consultant of 14 or so years experience. He has been helping software teams use BDD since before it was called that. Over the years he has used (and contributed to) a number of tools including FIT, Selenium, rspec story runner an


Big Bang Releases on the AppStore

Making large big bang releases on the AppStore is an inherently risky and hard problem. From our experience of releasing the largest update to our app a few weeks back, I would like to share some of the strategies and processes we put in place, to reduce the risk of such a release.

I qill also share our experience of creating a new approach to change aversion management. At realestate.com.au, we shipped a few weeks back, the largest update we have made in over 3 years. We did this release while

  • running no long running branches. All code in master – behind feature toggles
  • Releasing every 4 weeks for the previous 7 months, which are considerably large releases themselves
  • Transitioning the whole team to use Swift for nearly 100% of new code
  • Changing our underlying persistence layer from Core Data to Realm
  • Going from 3 to 10 people in the team
  • Distributed team
  • On a 6 year old codebase

In this talk, I will provide a blueprint of some of the strategies and processes we put in place to make sure we can make such a release possible.

Some of the strategies I will talk about include Release trains, Engineering docs, Small releases and our approach to tech debts. I will also talk about our approach to minimizing change aversion. We released the new navigation structure behind toggle, which the user can opt into.



Prasanna Gopalakrishnan

Technical lead
REA Group


Kotlin: The Pragmatic Language for Android

Kotlin, a relatively new programming language running on the JVM, has been making headlines as the more elegant alternative to Java in any of its applications. One of them is Android development and this talk will explore the benefits that the language offers for everyday coding.

The presentation will start by explaining what Kotlin is, who developed it and what their motivation was. Continuing on from there, there will be a demonstration of notable features of the language that set it apart from Java. Once the audience is more comfortable with the syntax, Android development will be introduced as a use case for the language, explaining what the benefits are and what it takes to start using Kotlin in existing apps. Finally, the conclusion will have some information about future developments and more learning resources for those interested.



Mike Gouline

Lead Data Engineer
Assembly Payments


7 Easy UX Secrets that Every Mobile Developer will Want to Know

Ephox’s rich text editors, TinyMCE and Textbox.io are two of the most complex and widely used JavaScript applications in the world: around 10 million people use these full-featured textediors every day. Last year, the team at Ephox took on the huge task of porting the 1500 module, shortcut-key driven, keyboard and mouse intensive application from desktop to mobile.

In this example-packed presentation, we share the experiences of our epic journey, the challenges faced, and the surprises that blindsided us. If you are planning to transition your own application from desktop to mobile, or create a new responsive web app, our 7 UX Secrets may just save you months of effort (and preserve your sanity!).



Anna Harrison

Director of UX
Ephox + TinyMCE


High Tech Delight – Programming the ‘Hard’ out of Hardware

Writing libraries and toolchains for your developer peers can be a challenge. Easy to use, flexible, testable, and extensible are all qualities we strive for when writing software that others will use. Hardware related tools specifically can be especially complex, where extra empathy and thoughtful process is often needed.

This session will be a walk-through of several case studies sourced from personal open source work, written for both the NodeJS Hardware Working Group and the vibrant worldwide Nodebots community at large. Lessons learned will be aplenty, providing some fresh perspectives on how deeply your code can improve the first impressions of those in the communities you wish to cultivate.



Suz Hinton

JavaScript Developer
https://noopkat.com/


Knit One, Compute One

Can a programming language describe art? Is knitting Turing complete? And just how many bytes of data does the average knitted scarf hold, anyway?

These are the questions that motivate Kris as both a knitter and a technologist. As an art form, knitting is inherently binary – just knit and purl. That means you can use sticks and string to encode data in a lot of different ways – like recording the day’s weather, noting enemy troop movements, or even knitting a computer virus. But that’s just the start! Through the act of knitting, the crafter becomes a kind of human CPU, utilising objects and data structures (needles) and free memory (ball of wool) to implement instructions (the pattern). Knitting patterns themselves are very similar to computer languages, with new syntax proposals emerging with innovative constructs and even compilers.

If you thought knitting was just an old-fashioned hobby for grandmas, this talk will open your eyes to the many ways this traditional craft is still relevant in the digital age. (And no, you don’t need to know how to knit!)



Kris Howard

Solutions Architect Manager
Amazon Web Services


Progressive Web Apps (PWAs): What has the Web ever Done for Us?

Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) bring us a step closer to not needing to develop native mobile apps. They bring with them some benefits and some drawbacks. This talk will give developers (whether they are web or native, mobile or desktop) an insight into the problems that PWAs can solve, how you go about building them, and some ways to decide if they are right for your project.



Gareth Jones

Consultant
Shine Solutions


Anko – The Ultimate Ninja of Kotlin Libraries?

Kotlin is a new language for the JVM that aims to be a “better Java”. Made in-house by Jetbrains, the company behind IntelliJ IDEA and also Android Studio, it’s been in development for more than 5 years. Just a few weeks ago the final version of Kotlin 1.0 saw the light of day.

The language itself gives one so much niceness and syntactic sugar that you’d probably never want to go back to coding in Java again. Things get even better with Anko. Anko is pretty much the ultimate Ninja of Kotlin libraries. The feature it’s best know for is its Layout DSL that allows one to programatically write UI code in Kotlin. No more XML layout and no awkward piecing together of your UI through clunky Java APIs. We will look at how to use and how to extend the Layout DSL for your own requirements and then move on to Anko’s advanced, non-layout-related features:

  • Intent wrappers
  • Shortcuts to system services
  • Asynchronous task management
  • Anko SQLite and more



Kai Koenig

Kai works as a Software Solutions Architect for Ventego Creative in Wellington, New Zealand. He co-founded the company with two partners and is also the CTO of Zen Ex Machina, a startup in the fields of digital & user experience consultancy based out of Canberra in Australia.


PhoneGap to Native – Rebuilding an Android App from Inside Out

How do you change the fundamental technology your app is built in? How do you rebuild your app gradually, while still shipping regular updates? Those are the questions we faced as Seek, when we concluded PhoneGap, the quick-fix solution we had used to originally create our Android app, wouldn’t allow us to deliver the experiences and features we wanted.

A common approach is to start with a clean slate – do a rewrite. It is a risky and costly approach and we opted for a different solution. Split the problem into smaller, distinct pieces and deal with them one by one. In four stages we went from fully web-based with almost no native capability, to having all the native flexibility we would have if we had started with a clean slate. In this talk, I’ll share the details of how we did it and what we learned in the process.



Krzysztof Koźmic

App Developer
Seek


Automating iOS CI Infrastructure at REA Group

The iOS team at REA Group is expanding. This necessitates a better tooling and continuous integration (CI) infrastructure to maintain our agility and speed in delivering app releases. Recognising this, we have improved our process and CI infrastructure by utilising Buildkite and automation tools.

In this talk, we’ll start by discussing our motivation, the previous CI infrastructure, and team requirements. Then, we will talk about the new infrastructure. Specifically:

  • Overview of Buildkite and how it meets our requirements
  • The overall CI architecture and build machines
  • Automating the creation of build machines
  • How the new CI integrates with our development process

This talk will be a great opportunity to learn about the challenges we faced and lessons we’ve learnt around automating iOS CI infrastructure at REA Group.



Donny Kurniawan

Senior Developer
REA Group


Polished Droids: Bringing Android Apps to Chromebooks

At I/O this year, Google announced that Android apps and Google Play itself were coming to Chromebooks. So what does this actually mean for Android developers? How easy or hard is it in practice to bring an Android app across to work well on Chromebooks? And what do Chromebook users think of all this?

Based on my recent experience of getting a popular Android open source app project over to work well on Chromebooks, I will cover topics such as:

  • Which Chromebooks can run Android apps
  • Underlying technology used to bring Google Play and Android apps to Chromebooks
  • Techniques for developing and testing apps on Chromebooks and the differences to existing Android devices
  • Potential issues and pitfalls to be aware of in bringing Android apps to Chromebooks

This talk is aimed at experienced Android developers and will give them a fast track to what is involved in getting existing and new Android apps working well on Chromebooks as well as the opportunities and challenges that Android apps on Chromebooks bring to the existing Android ecosystem.



Maksim Lin

Freelance Android Developer
Manichord Pty Ltd


Prototype and Design App Store Ready App In Interface Builder

Designers will learn how to prototype and design App Store ready app in Interface Builder and Developers will learn how to use @IBDesignable, @IBInspectable and Swift protocol extensions to implement an extendable UI library.

Firstly, we will open Xcode and start with a new iOS app project to demonstrate how to use @IBDesignable and @IBInspectable to implement customised UI elements in Xcode and use them in Interface Builder. After that, we will introduce an open source project IBAnimatable. We will install IBAnimatable using CocoaPods in the project above. Then we will live design customised UI, animations, and transitions in Interface Builder.

In the second part, we will take a further look at how to implement a flexible and extendable UI library using Swift protocol extensions. To demonstrate the power of Swift protocol extensions, we will integrate an existing UI library with IBAnimatable to add animation features. In our case, we use a big enough UI library called Material as an example. Then add animation capability for Material UI elements using Animatable protocol within IBAnimatable. We can use Swift protocol extensions to develop and extend any UI elements.

We will live code in Xcode and live design in Interface Builder during the entire talk. We will also use interactive slides made in Interface Builder. And display them within an iOS app on an iPad Pro.



Jake Lin

iOS Developer
realestate.com.au


Less Conventional Swift

The Swift programming language is now in its third year of life, and a number of patterns and common practices are arising. This talks is not about them. We’ll explore some less conventional, yet very effective and elegant ways to write Swift code, inspired by the functional programming world.

We won’t be talking hipster-monadic-burritos, but real actionable tools and technique that you can bring back to work tomorrow and easily introduce to your team-mates. In fact these concepts will all be introduced together with their real world usages.

Come and see how thinking outside of the box and writing code in a bit less conventional way can make you a lot more productive.



Gio Lodi

Software Engineer
iflix


Building Containerised Microservices with Swift

There’s nothing better than containerizing things. Everybody loves microservices. Brand new programming languages are the new hotness.

In this session, we’ll combine all three: we’ll explore the use of Swift for the construction of microservices, which we’ll containerize using Docker. Learn how to use your mobile development skills for non-mobile Swift development.

Focusing on the Swift open source project’s releases, we’ll walk through Swift setup, installation, community, and tools, and then teach the basics of Swift programming as we create and containerize a simple micro service. We’ll be using Docker for Mac.

By the end of this session, attendees will:

  • understand the basics of Swift
  • know how to install, and work with Swift on Linux
  • know how to build a simple microservice with Swift
  • be aware of the possibilities of combining Swift with Docker

We promise, despite the buzzwords, this is actually useful! Inch ever closer to being a full-stack developer using only Swift.



Jon Manning

co-founder
Secret Lab.


Data as Storyteller — How To Use Boring Numbers To Move An Audience

We are steeped in data…broad in scope, deep in meaning, and utterly complex. Can this treasure trove be transformed to illuminate ideas without being overwhelming? Or boring? Can we create emotive experiences for the audience with just data?

The premise is simple: How can we use the lessons from 100 years of cinematography to regain the power of persuasion and bring life to information, making them more like movies where data is the storyteller and you the director?

We will take you along our journey that resulted in Perspective, an app used by the world’s top presenters to convey the true meaning behind their data.



Farshad Nayeri

Founder & CEO
Pixxa


Physics, and Other Meaningless Tweaks Your Users Will Love!

This talk covers the use of physics and similar real world effects in your applications to make them, well more physical. Despite Apple’s push towards ugly design (and now slow move back towards something useful) your users still like their apps to work the way the real world works and I think deep down inside Apple knows this. There is a slew of great APIs which are rarely used to make your app a lot more real feeling.

In this session we will take a look at:

  • skeuomorphic and playful interactions from both a designer and developer perspective
  • some good examples of apps using skeuomorphic design even in the current iOS landscape
  • some good examples of apps using playful interactions
  • cover the techniques and APIs Apple has provided to use these design elements in your apps
  • Live code demo (because they always work) of some of these techniques to show how easy they are to implement

*** User love is not guaranteed.



Tim Nugent

App Developer & Game Designer
https://lonely.coffee/


Building Containerised Microservices with Swift

There’s nothing better than containerizing things. Everybody loves microservices. Brand new programming languages are the new hotness.

In this session, we’ll combine all three: we’ll explore the use of Swift for the construction of microservices, which we’ll containerize using Docker. Learn how to use your mobile development skills for non-mobile Swift development.

Focusing on the Swift open source project’s releases, we’ll walk through Swift setup, installation, community, and tools, and then teach the basics of Swift programming as we create and containerize a simple micro service. We’ll be using Docker for Mac.

By the end of this session, attendees will:

  • understand the basics of Swift
  • know how to install, and work with Swift on Linux
  • know how to build a simple microservice with Swift
  • be aware of the possibilities of combining Swift with Docker

We promise, despite the buzzwords, this is actually useful! Inch ever closer to being a full-stack developer using only Swift.



Tim Nugent

App Developer & Game Designer
https://lonely.coffee/


Unidirectional Data Flow For Mobile

Unidirectional Data Flow is the new hotness in UI architecture, but how do we apply this to mobile apps? The easy answer is “Use React Native”, but who would want to take the easy road? Instead, in this talk we’ll go through the key elements of the unidirectional data flow style and look at how to architect this for mobile using an example Swift iOS app.

This will include:

  • Defining core application state and leveraging change events to update the view layer
  • Wiring up an Action dispatcher to manage state change, including background event
  • Approaches to implement navigation flow on top of the UIKit framework

Attendees will gain a clear conceptual understanding of the Unidirectional style, and the practical benefits & drawbacks they’re likely to encounter using it in a mobile app.



Sam Ritchie

Chief Codesplicer
Codesplice


Quickly Checking your Code for Fun & Profit

Laziness is one of Larry Wall’s “three great virtues of a programmer”, but most people probably don’t consider it a virtue when writing tests! Wouldn’t it be great though, if we could write a program that generates our tests for us? As it turns out, we can and should do this using property-based testing. I’ll go through some example testing scenarios in a few popular mobile programming languages, aiming to demonstrate:

  • What property-based testing is and why EVERYONE should be using it (not just people coding in functional languages!)
  • How generators can quickly & easily come up with more thorough test inputs than a programmer typing in magic numbers
  • How to (and how not to) define properties to specify program behaviour
  • The genius of shrinkers and why they can save you hours of tedious debugging and questioning your life choices

Attendees will gain a solid & practical understanding of how they can apply property-based testing to their own code, in fashion that is both enjoyable and lucrative.



Sam Ritchie

Chief Codesplicer
Codesplice


Tensor What? AI and mobile

AI and mobile are are great combination. Over the past few years we seen an explosion of AI related mobile technology: Siri, Google now, Image recognition, Auto e-mail replies and voice recognition. We will conduct a high level, broad overview of the AI field, looking at some of the recent breakthroughs on mobile and the technologies behind them. We will also look at the Google TensorFlow library in more detail explaining what it is exploring some of the models that have been built using TensorFlow. Finally we will look at how TensorFlow can be used to enhance your own mobile apps, providing examples of both running TensorFlow directly on a mobile and on a server to provide a web services. This will include a live demo of my phone using TensorFlow to recognise a banana!



Luke Sleeman

Sr. Android Developer
Itty Bitty Apps


Was It Frag-ment To Be?

The Fragment API forms one of the core components google has provided to build Android apps. Despite the key role it is meant to play, many people find Fragments hard to use, prone to bugs and frustrating. We will pose the question – do we actually need Fragments? Are they worth the trouble? We will review some of the common problems with the Fragment API and look at why Fragments are so prone to issues. We will also survey some alternative approaches to using Fragments look at what solutions provided by the community and review best practices. Finally will also look at what advice Google has provided and how they are improving fragments.



Luke Sleeman

Sr. Android Developer
Itty Bitty Apps


Increasing The Confidence In Your Service Integrations

Testing mobile apps has always been difficult, especially across integration points. When a service has multiple clients, at multiple versions, it makes modifications incredibly difficult. Breakages between an app and service are often discovered late in the development cycle (or after it has been released!) and the causes are difficult to diagnose. Contract testing is an idea that has become very popular in the micro services area, but I believe is equally applicable to mobile applications.

Pact is a tool that was built to test the contracts between micro services. I built a Swift library that conforms to the same specification to allow the same testing methods to be used between an iOS mobile app and a service. With this talk I will show how you can use Pact to test the boundaries between your mobile app and services.

Although the examples in this talk are Swift / iOS specific, the principles around contract testing and the use of Pact are applicable across client / server systems.



Andrew Spinks

Software Consultant
DiUS


RxJava and Why You Should Care

RxJava has been taking the Android world by storm. There is not a single API in Android that doesn’t have a RxJava wrapper available. Yet the steep learning curve and the overly simplistic examples available can make it hard to grasp the real benefit of RxJava. Many developers are left with questions like:

  • Do I really need RxJava if my API responses don’t require mapping and filtering operations?
  • Most of my features are simple, is it worth it to implement an RxJava based architecture for simple features?

In this talk we will briefly introduce RxJava and the most important concepts. Next we will look at how you would implement a basic feature in an Android app and we will closely look at the additional benefits that RxJava will provide other than just basic mapping and filtering of data. You will see how threading turns into an afterthought instead of an upfront design decision and the impact this will have on the overall architecture of your app.



Jeroen Tietema

Android Tech Lead
Nine Digital


Realm The NoSQL Of Mobile

SQLite is the default database that most developers choose when creating a mobile application. SQLite is not without, its challenges. Threading, object mapping, transactions, and data change notifications. Some libraries can help manage these challenges. They often tend only to focus on the object mapping aspect. In this talk, I will introduce Realm, an alternative persistence engine to SQLite. Realm address the challenges often found in SQLite and brings a new method for storing and accessing data to the mobile landscape.



Mitchell Tilbrook

Lead Software Engineer
SeatFrog


Implementing A Reliable IoT Device With Mobile Network Connectivity

IOTA (a subsidiary of South East Water) and Hydrix (an engineering consultancy) have developed the OneBox, a device that provides water authorities the ability to control and monitor pumps, pressure sewer units and other remote assets from the office or smartphones. Thousands of these devices have now been deployed in Australia and overseas, without any reported software issues.

This talk will present some of the architectural patterns that were used to maximize reliability of the embedded firmware that resides in OneBox.



Filip Zalio

Solution Architect
Hydrix


SkillsCasts
Other Years