2 DAY CONFERENCE

Groovy & Grails eXchange 2013

Topics covered at #Groovy&GrailsX

Thursday, 12th - Friday, 13th December at The Crypt, St James Church Clerkenwell, London

14 experts. will be speaking. Starts at 9:00 AM.

**Want to make yourself more employable by big name companies such as Sky, Wired.com and Linkedin who are implementing Groovy & Grails?** Need to keep up with the latest industry developments in object-oriented programming to stay ahead of the game?

Then come to the sixth annual Groovy & Grails eXchange, a two-day conference bringing together industry leading experts and developers from all over the world to learn and share everything about the Groovy and Grails ecosystem.

**The Groovy & Grails eXchange 2014 has been scheduled! Please visit the #GGX 2014 webpage for more details.

Thanks to our sponsors

The Groovy update

In this session, Guillaume will guide you through the latest developments of Groovy, what happened in Groovy 2.2 and what's coming in Groovy 2.3, and beyond, with Groovy 3!

It's this time of the year where the Groovy fans gather in London for Groovy Grails eXchange to learn about what's been going on in the Groovy world and ecosystem. In this session, Guillaume will guide you through the latest developments of Groovy, what happened in Groovy 2.2 and what's coming in Groovy 2.3, and beyond, with Groovy 3!

Guillaume LaForge

Guillaume is the Groovy Project Manager. Along with Graeme Rocher, he founded G2One, the company dedicated to sustaining and leading the development of both Groovy / Grails and providing professional services around those technologies.

Making Java APIs Groovy

In this session, we will take an existing Java API and try to make it Groovy step by step, introducing you to various DSL building techniques in Groovy. After this talk, you should be able to build your own Groovy wrappers around existing Java APIs and offer them to the community!

One of the major advantages of Groovy is that you can leverage existing Java APIs very easily: you can use them in Groovy just like you would in Java. However, Groovy is a perfect fit for DSLs and it's possible to make those APIs rock: why would you be obliged to use them in a Java fashion if we can build Groovy APIs for them?

Cédric Champeau

Cédric Champeau is a core Groovy committer. He joined SpringSource, a division of VMware, in order to help developing the language. Prior to that, he spent several years at Lingway, a software editor, where he used Groovy in multiple industrial contexts including DSLs for natural language processing, scripting or even workflows.

DevQA: make your testers happy with Groovy, Spock and Geb

In this talk I will show a live example on how to setup an independent project for functional tests using Gradle, Groovy, Spock and Geb.

Writing functional tests using Geb in a Grails application is fine for a development team. But when you have QA automation engineers, giving them access to the Grails app might not be the best solution (specially when they belong to a different team). So the same way DevOps allow developers and sysadmins collaborate together, let's talk about DevQA, and make them happy using a framework stack powered by Groovy.

Alvaro Sanchez-Mariscal

Alvaro is a passionate software developer and agile enthusiast with over 12 years of experience. He started his career in 2001 coding in Perl and Java, but then quickly focused on Java EE, working for companies like IBM BCS, BEA Systems or Sun Microsystems.

Creating Architectural Flexibility using Groovy

In this talk, David will showcase some of the many features of Groovy. How the flexibility of the language alongside other JVM languages can be used to give flexibility in your architecture and allow your system to avoid some of the baggage of large scale development.

With plenty of code, strong opinions, examples and a helicopter, we'll be covering Postels law, internal integration, static/ dynamic and why Groovy is among the best languages for enabling large scale development.

David A. Dawson

David Dawson is Principal Consultant at Simplicity Itself and works with their clients to continuously and sustainably delivering valuable software.

Modern Groovy Enterprise Stack

During this talk I will discuss how at UnderwriteMe we're using many Groovy and Java technologies together to get a modern and flexible stack of multiple applications with each one of them using technologies that match its needs.

I will show our use of Groovy, together with Dropwizard and Grails, and explain why we decided to integrate our services using Spring Integration and RabbitMq. I will also discuss how we are unit, integration and browser testing our applications using Spock, Spock Spring, Remote Control and Geb. Finally I'll explain why it's all built using Gradle and show how we're using Gradle to setup our IntelliJ project to allow running all types of tests directly from the IDE meaning that we can easily and quickly debug even our integration and browser tests.

Marcin Erdmann

Marcin has been developing in Groovy since 2010. Currently based in London but has worked in other European countries in the past. He believes in Open Source Software and has a strong need to give back to the community whenever possible.Marcin loves Open Source Software and has a strong need to give back to the community whenever possible. That’s why he’s proud to be the current project lead of Geb, a Groovy Browser automation library. In the past he contributed to many open source projects in the Groovy ecosystem and he enjoys going to conferences both as an attendee and a speaker. That’s where you will find him with a pint of good beer in hand engaged in lengthy discussions on how to make software development process and quality better.

Ratpack: A toolkit for JVM web applications

As JVM developers we've been lucky to have the holy Grails available for our web application needs. While Grails is the right tool for so many jobs, sometimes you need to scratch an itch with something a little lighter and more trimmed down. Enter Ratpack!

It's a web toolkit inspired by Ruby's Sinatra but distinctively JVM. It builds on great foundations such as Netty and Guice while leveraging Gradle and Groovy to make things dead simple.

Luke Daley

Luke Daley is a Principal Engineer with Gradleware. When he's not working on Gradle, you'll find Luke hacking on other projects in the Groovy ecosystem like Grails, Spock and Geb.

NoSQL with Grails

In this talk, the NoSQL we will use is Mongo, and will go over the various options to create a robust multi-database Grails app with Mongo and a traditional RDBMS.

One of the biggest changes in data storage has been to go from soley Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) database - web systems, to mix mode systems. Where you can have the web tier plus a traditional RDBS system, and a NoSQL system when performance matters. One of the challenges is determining not only how to lay out the system but also how to write the code with Grails.

Joseph Nusairat

Joseph Faisal Nusairat, author of Beginning JBoss Seam and co-author Beginning Groovy & Grails, is a Java developer who worked full time in the Columbus Ohio area for 11 years before relocating to his new home of always sunny Phoenix Arizona.

Developing SPI applications using Grails and AngularJS

In this talk I will speak about how Grails can fit with a single-page architecture and discuss the pros and cons of developing that kind of applications.

Client-side MVC frameworks like AngularJS are getting more popular over time. They represent a big architectural change to what web developers are used to: moving from server-side MVC to a browser based one. I will also do a live demo of a sample web application using AngularJS, Grails, the events-push plugin and MongoDB.

Alvaro Sanchez-Mariscal

Alvaro is a passionate software developer and agile enthusiast with over 12 years of experience. He started his career in 2001 coding in Perl and Java, but then quickly focused on Java EE, working for companies like IBM BCS, BEA Systems or Sun Microsystems.

Polyglot programming in Grails 2

All of the major programming languages available on the JVM are supported by The Grails Framework. These include Java, Groovy, Scala, Clojure and others. This session will dive in to that aspect of the framework with a focus on Scala and Clojure and will demonstrate what is involved in adding support for new languages.

Grails is one of the most flexible and most powerful frameworks on The Java Platform. Grails leverages the flexibility offered by the platform in a way that other web frameworks do not. Grails is a fantastic platform for polglot web programming. Part of what makes Grails so compelling is its really powerful plugin system.

The Grails plugin system allows capabilities to be bolted on to applications, including adding support for a variety of programming languages.

Jeff Brown

Jeff Scott Brown is an Engineer at Pivotal and is a long time member of the core Grails development team. He is a co-author of The Definitive Guide To Grails Second Edition and for over 10 years Jeff has been involved in designing and building object oriented systems.

Is Groovy Static or Dynamic?

Groovy has entered the realms of being a statically compiled language, competing with Java, Scala, Ceylon and Kotlin for market share. Is this the right direction for Groovy to go? This session will investigate this and many other questions.

Groovy started life as the dynamic symbiote to Java. In order to achieve this Groovy wasn't totally "duck typing", it supported optional runtime type checking. It was though still very much a dynamic language with a full meta-object protocol, competing with JRuby, Jython and Clojure for market share.

With the additional of @TypeChecked and @CompileStatic and other things, Groovy has entered the realms of being a statically compiled language, competing with Java, Scala, and Kotlin for market share.

Is this the right direction for Groovy to go? Is claiming to be both a static and a dynamic language ruining the Groovy message? Is it ruining Groovy? Is @TypeChecked fundamentally different from @CompileStatic? This session will investigate these questions and may serve as a place to learn about these things or a place to debate the future direction of Groovy.

Russel Winder

Russel Winder is an independent consultant, analyst, author, expert witness, and trainer at Skills Matter and an expert on Java, Groovy, Scala, Python, D, Go. Gradle, SCons, Waf, SBT. Bazaar, Mercurial, Git.

Message Driven Architecture in Grails

This presentation will demonstrate and discuss architecture design patterns for implementing a message-driven architecture in Grails to allow for better modularity, scalability, and code reusability.

By improving Grails' convention-over-configuration application design with a message driven architecture, applications can benefit from improved modularity, scalability, and code reusability.

Given that Grails is already a fully loaded Spring application, the content of this presentation will focus on developing message-driven patterns, techniques, and strategies based on Spring Integration. The core of the presentation will focus on developing an application workflow that is amenable to pluggable components and services at given phases in the workflow's lifecycle using Spring Integration.

Dan Woods

Dan Woods is a web developer who is passionate about software architecture and best practices. Dan solves software development problems using Groovy and engages the community by sharing solutions through his Twitter account, blog, and GitHub contribu

Road to Grails 3.0

In this talk Grails project lead, Graeme Rocher, will talk through the latest and greatest happenings in the world of Grails including a walk through of the features included Grails 2.3 and upcoming in Grails 3.0

Graeme Rocher

Graeme Rocher is the project lead and co-founder of the Grails web application framework. He's a member of the JSR-241 Expert Group which standardizes the Groovy language. Graeme authored the Definitive Guide to Grails for Apress and is a frequent sp

Metaprogramming With The Groovy Runtime

This Part 1 of 2 will cover the runtime metaprogramming capabilities of Groovy. The session will dive deep into Groovy's Meta Object Protocol (MOP) which implements the incredibly dynamic runtime dispatch mechanism. Part 2 of 2 will cover Groovy's compile time metaprogramming capabilities.

The dynamic runtime nature of Groovy is one of the things that sets it apart from standard Java and makes it a fantastic language for building dynamic applications for the Java Platform. The metaprogramming capabilities offered by the language provide everything that an application development team needs to build systems that are far more capable than their all Java counterparts.

This session will cover the runtime metaprogramming capabilities of Groovy. The session will dive deep into Groovy's Meta Object Protocol (MOP) which implements the incredibly dynamic runtime dispatch mechanism. Come and enjoy a lot of live code demonstrating really powerful runtime features of the language.

Jeff Brown

Jeff Scott Brown is an Engineer at Pivotal and is a long time member of the core Grails development team. He is a co-author of The Definitive Guide To Grails Second Edition and for over 10 years Jeff has been involved in designing and building object oriented systems.

Build Grails applications with Gradle

2012 saw the addition of very useful support for the Maven inclined Grails users of the world. For those more inclined in all things G*, this session will look at how we can use the Gradle build tool to build and wrangle Grails applications.

Luke Daley

Luke Daley is a Principal Engineer with Gradleware. When he's not working on Gradle, you'll find Luke hacking on other projects in the Groovy ecosystem like Grails, Spock and Geb.

Restfully Async with Grails 2.3

In this talk Grails project lead, Graeme Rocher, will talk through the latest Async features offered by Grails and how they can be used to create elegant non-blocking REST APIs

Graeme Rocher

Graeme Rocher is the project lead and co-founder of the Grails web application framework. He's a member of the JSR-241 Expert Group which standardizes the Groovy language. Graeme authored the Definitive Guide to Grails for Apress and is a frequent sp

Open Source and You

In Peter Ledbrook's talk you will learn that open source software cannot be treated as simply having no financial cost and that investment reaps rewards. We'll also discuss how to get communities more active and engaged.

Open Source has been around for a long time, with perhaps it's first formal appearance in the guise of the GNU project in 1983. 30 years later, do we yet understand how open source works? How is it funded? Is it a sustainable model? And how should we as developers approach open source?

These are important questions to answer if we are to gain the benefits of open source and avoid disappointment. You will learn that open source software cannot be treated as simply having no financial cost and that investment reaps rewards. We'll also discuss how to get communities more active and engaged.

Peter Ledbrook

Peter is one of the core Grails committers and he has been developing with Grails since version 0.2 (give or take 0.1). He created the GWT Grails plugin as an exercise to see whether it was possible, but it has since grown into something that can support serious development.

Reactor - a foundation for asynchronous applications on the JVM

This talk will give Reactor a proper introduction and show sample code that demonstrates the event-driven and composition-based nature of Reactor.

Reactor was recently made public after a two-year incubation, evolving slowly alongside frameworks like Storm, Akka, GPars or Vert.x. Integrated with Grails through events plugin, Reactor takes the best ideas from several asynchronous toolsets and synthesizes them into a coherent framework that supports a variety of runtime topologies and makes it easy for developers to efficiently leverage their cloud or traditional hardware assets.

Reactor is equally at home inside or outside a Spring ApplicationContext and also provides first-class Groovy support in the form of DSLs and language extensions. Special attention has been given to make Reactor easy enough to use to create single-file node.js-like applications, while maintaining a solid asynchronous toolset that works with Data tools like Gemfire, Spring Integration, and Spring Batch.

Stéphane Maldini

Working at Pivotal, Stephane is Software Architect with extensive experience aligning various OSS technologies. Multi-tasker eating tech 24/7, Stephane is interested in cloud computing, data science and messaging. He is on a mission to help organisations transform their applications into consumer-grade software. He co-founded the Reactor Project to help developers create reactive, low-latency fast data architectures on the JVM and beyond.

Groovy for System Administrators

This talk will discuss how system administrators can use Groovy to build scripts designed to help facilitate a more-automated server environment.

We often think about Groovy in strict terms as being a programming language, and usually have conversations about it in terms of web development. However, Groovy is also a powerful scripting language, and can be leveraged to build tools to assist in every outlet of system administration.

Dan Woods

Dan Woods is a web developer who is passionate about software architecture and best practices. Dan solves software development problems using Groovy and engages the community by sharing solutions through his Twitter account, blog, and GitHub contribu

How Gradle Saved the Day at a Major Company

What happens when a major client decides they need to modularize and upgrade their processes, BUT the current build system consists of Perl, Makefiles, Ant builds M4 macros? In addition has a source control system that relies on multiple directories all randomly arranged. Simple, you pull out Gradle!

This talk will discuss how to use Gradle to modernize and customize old build processes that have gotten out of control. How using the power of a declarative system that is not rigid allows you to create an extensible markup system.

Joseph Nusairat

Joseph Faisal Nusairat, author of Beginning JBoss Seam and co-author Beginning Groovy & Grails, is a Java developer who worked full time in the Columbus Ohio area for 11 years before relocating to his new home of always sunny Phoenix Arizona.

Building lightning fast REST Services with Dropwizard and Groovy

In this talk, I will demonstrate how to use best of breed tools in the Groovy ecosystem --- GVM, Lazybones, Shade, Spock, Groovy, Gradle & Cloud Foundry --- to build, test and deploy DropWizard applications.

Dropwizard is a JVM framework for building fast, ops-friendly high performance RESTful web services. It comes with out-of-the-box support for configuration management, logging and health monitoring.

I will also discuss how DropWizard services fit within a Grails-centric architecture and provide alternatives from the Grails world for many of the niceties provided by DropWizard.

Tomas Lin

Tomas Lin is a Grails developer at BSkyB. He has worked with Groovy and Grails extensively on projects like Secret Escapes, Suzuki.ca, Cruiseline fans, Dan Aykryod Wines and Empora.com

Application Architecture in Groovy

Groovy provides excellent faculties for architecting applications that are extensible and lend themselves to maintainability and rapid iteration. This talk will discuss how to responsibly leverage those parts of Groovy to architect modern, more-readable, less-magical applications.

Dan Woods

Dan Woods is a web developer who is passionate about software architecture and best practices. Dan solves software development problems using Groovy and engages the community by sharing solutions through his Twitter account, blog, and GitHub contribu

Groovy Micro Services with Spring Boot

In this talk David will discuss architecture theory while live coding a series of Micro Services in Groovy (and friends), and show them working in concert to implement a highly decoupled, yet complex, application stack.

Micro Service Architectures have quietly gathered fans and implementations over the past couple of years, as much for their ease of implementation as the incredible adaptability they add to your systems.

The first decision to make is what framework to implement in. If it's HTTP based, there are a plethora of options, if it isn't then you are much more constrained. You assume you will lose the benefits of your investment in Spring and the existing technologies as Spring has historically required a fair amount of setup, what if that weren't the case?

David A. Dawson

David Dawson is Principal Consultant at Simplicity Itself and works with their clients to continuously and sustainably delivering valuable software.

#GGX Park Bench Panel

Join the #GGX Park Bench Panel Discussion to debate the day's talks with the experts and delegates. Have an opinion? Come share it and take the place of a panellist!

Blogs

THRIVING COMMUNITY

This is a great chance to meet other developers in your field and make new connections. Stuck on a problem? Have a question? Take the opportunity to crowd source it at the park bench discussion where not only speakers but the community are encouraged to get up and share!

HELP SPREAD THE WORD

If you have a blog or site and would like to let others know about this conference, we really appreciate it! If you blog about the conference and email us at marketing@skillsmatter.com, we'll return the favour and link back to you in this list of great community blogs.

Guillaume Laforge's blog

Peter Ledbrook's blog

Robert Fletcher's blog

Graeme Rocher's Blog

Luke Daley's Blog

Marcin Erdmann's Blog

Alvaro Sanchez-Mariscal's Blog

Russell Winder's Blog

David Dawson's Blog

Joseph Nusairat's Blog

Jeff Brown's Blog

Dan Wood's Blog

Tomás Lin's Blog

Marco Vermeulen's Blog

The Crypt, St James Church Clerkenwell

Located on the edge of the City, the Crypt on the Green, Clerkenwell, offers a magnificent venue for Skills Matter's eXchanges, In-the-Brain Sessions and meetings. Situated on Clerkenwell Green, opposite The Three Kings pub, the Crypt is conveniently positioned between Farringdon and Angel Stations, providing access to mainline and underground services.

history
St James Church, Clerkenwell is on the site of the first nunnery to be built in London dating back to 1100AD. History abounds. Today Clerkenwell is a vibrant urban village in the heart of London offering arts, entertainment and culture.

The Crypt, St James Church Clerkenwell

Clerkenwell Close, Clerkenwell, London, EC1R 0EA, GB


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