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1 DAY CONFERENCE

Functional Programming eXchange 2015

Topics covered at #fpx

Thursday, 11th June at Skills Matter, London

7 experts. will be speaking. Starts at 9:30 AM.

Functional programming has become synonymous with modern development with ever augmenting importance in OO and a proliferation of purely functional languages being evolved today.The Functional Programming eXchange (FPX) recognises the impact of the most innovative and pioneering approaches which are currently unfolding across the spectrum. Providing a comprehensive view of the landscape through expert talks and open discussions, the conference aims to present the latest advances with an eye to universal application. In a like manner FPX offers practical tips and tricks on how to successfully percolate functional programming into your workplace.

Join us at #FPX in London on June 11th

The Functional Programming eXchange is an independent conference, organised for and by the community, we aim to organise a jam packed day of talks and discussions on the topics that drive innovation across the functional programming languages.

Call For Papers Now Closed

The Call for Papers has now closed. Thank you to all those who have submitted, talks are currently being deliberated and individually selected. We will contact all submissions with the programme committee's decision in due course.

Thanks to our sponsors

The lazy programmer's guide to writing 1000's of tests: An introduction to property based testing

We are all familiar with example-based testing, as typified by TDD and BDD. Property-based testing takes a very different approach, where a single test is run hundreds of times with randomly generated inputs.

Property-based testing is a great way to find edge cases, and also helps you to understand and document the behaviour of your code under all conditions.

This talk will introduce property-based testing and show how it works, and why you should consider adding it to your arsenal of testing tools.

Scott Wlaschin

Scott has over 20 years experience in software development, design and architecture, covering all aspects of business software.

Functional Programming Principles

We should definitely look forward to new ideas in functional programming. At the same time we should make sure we have a solid understanding of the basics. With this talk I want to introduce the audience to the most important concepts in functional programming and why they are making programming easier. I’ll be showing examples in several languages (Clojure, Haskell, Java8) to illustrate: referential transparency, side effects, immutable and peristent data structures, laziness, memoization, currying, composition, list comprehensions, recursion and more. Interruptions are welcome, bring your secret questions, I’ll be happy to answer.

Renzo Borgatti

Renzo Borgatti started looking into functional programming 3 years ago with Clojure, the language he now uses daily at the Mailonline. 4 months ago he also got into Haskell and that sort of closes the loop between typed and untyped lambda calculus. Before that Renzo did Java, Ruby and Objective-C for a range of industries and a total of 15 years in the field. Renzo enjoys speaking at user groups and conferences alike, as well as hacking on code whenever he can.

Games and 3D Graphics in Arcadia

Arcadia is the integration of Clojure into the Unity 3D game engine and development environment. Unity exports to nearly all major gaming platforms, while Clojure's functional data and capacity for live programming and optimizing macros provide unique benefits to game developers. In this session Timothy Gardner will discuss progress since their last release, the internals of the Arcadia compiler, and the ramifications of industrial game development in Clojure, with live usage demos.

Timothy Gardner

Tim is a computer scientist and illustrator with particular interest in the visualization of mathematical structures and calculi.

Functional Programming in an Imperative World

Once upon a time there was a small company with a large codebase. That codebase had been written in the well understood languages of "VeeBeeDotNet" and "CeeSharp". After a while, more people starting working for the small company, and while they all knew some CeeSharp and VeeBeeDotNet, some of them also spoke strange foreign languages like "Erlang" and "EffSharp". They liked these languages, and were unwilling to give up what they saw as their powerful magical properties of pureness. So they hatched a plan..

This talk is a completely anecdotal review of how a group of developers (not managers) introduced functional techniques and languages into a company with an existing imperative code base - and existing imperative coders! Learn how we convinced management it wasn't insane. How we picked low risk, high impact tasks to illustrate language advantages. And how we spread the joy to others who hadn't used functional programming languages before.

Michael Newton

Developer, Architect, Trainer, Consultant; Michael runs @mavnn ltd along with his wife, providing training and consultancy. If it relates to learning about or using anything that relates to .net, functional programming or build/infrastructure tooling we can probably help you.

Time Travel for Game Development with Elm

Elm is a purely Functional Reactive Programming language which happens to have the best current implementation of a Time Travelling Debugger (inspired by Bret Victor's "Inventing on Principle" talk) and is ideally suited for games and UIs.

We'll see how FRP, a strong yet simple(r than Haskell) type system and an interactive programming workflow make developing a small game a much more pleasant experience compared to the mainstream game engines.

Claudia Doppioslash

Claudia Doppioslash is a Game Developer and a moderately smug LISP weenie. Known in programming circles for her undying love for obscure and mind-bending programming languages, she has not yet given up on using LISP, and functional languages to develop games.

What we learned from building full-stack web applications in F#

In recent years, there has been a push to promote so-called isomorphic web applications: the same JavaScript code is able to run both on the server and the client. This allows a very fluid and uncluttered style of development. It also helps keep code DRY and provides opportunities for client-server interactions that would otherwise be complex to set up.

However these advantages are not exclusively available in JavaScript. Thanks to its F#-to-JavaScript compiler, WebSharper allows the same benefits combined with the strict typing and terse syntax of F#. It provides a set of abstractions for server-side, client-side and multi-tiered code that greatly enhance modularity and composability. In this session Loïc presents a number of case studies where this style has boosted productivity in his team and enabled them to deliver applications with much less code and in much less time.

Loïc Denuzière

Interested in functional programming almost since he started programming, Loïc Denuzière has dabbled in F#, OCaml, Haskell, Common Lisp and many others. Loïc currently divides his time between working on the WebSharper ecosystem and using it for various projects at IntelliFactory.

Build your own effects

Most practical programming languages include ways of performing various non-functional effects, such as exceptions, generators, dynamic binding and concurrency. Languages typically offer ways for programmers to define new functions, new types, and sometimes even new syntax, but the set of available effects is usually baked into the language and cannot be extended within programs.

In this talk I'll show how a single language construct, the effect handler, makes it possible to define all the above effects and more within a program, transferring power from language designers to language users.

Jeremy Yallop

Jeremy is a senior researcher at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, where he's a member of the OCaml Labs project and teaches an advanced functional programming course. He's the lead developer of the ocaml-ctypes foreign function library and is currently involved in the development of several new features for the OCaml language, including a typed macro system and support for overloading.

Skills Matter


WE'VE MOVED: Skills Matter has recently relocated to a fantastic new venue CodeNode

10 South Place, London EC2M 7EB.


CodeNode provides a great selection of event spaces with all the facilities you need for a vibrant, interactive and successful tech event.

How to contact Skills Matter

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Skills Matter

10 South Place, London, EC2M 7EB, GB


View details, travel and nearby hotels

Call For Papers Now Closed

The Call for Papers has now closed. Thank you to all those who have submitted, talks are currently being deliberated and individually selected. We will contact all submissions with the programme committee's decision in due course.

Available Packages

    • 64-BIT SPONSORSHIP
    • Engage with the #functionalpx community! Show off your team, projects & tools at your #functionalpx conference booth!

      Brand Visibility Benefits
      Engagement Benefits
      • Your own booth at #functionalpx (160x80cm)
      • Your sponsored message with hot linked logo in the #functionalpx post-conference newsletter
      • Two items (leaflet, device, pen or notepad) included in all #functionalpx swag bags
      • 2 free tickets to the conference which you can gift to your clients, your engineering team or members of Computing At School (teachers learning computing to teach the new National Computing Curriculum).
    • 32-BIT SPONSORSHIP
    • Brand Visibility Benefits
      Engagement Benefits
      • Your sponsored message with hot linked logo in the the #functionalpx post-conference newsletter;
      • One item (leaflet, device, pen or notepad) included in 150 #functionalpx swag bags;
      • 2 free tickets to the conference which you can gift to your clients, your engineering team or members of Computing At School (teachers learning computing to teach the new National Computing Curriculum).
    • 16-BIT SPONSORSHIP
    • Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo (small) on the #functionalpx 2015 web pages;
      • Your own dedicated partner page on skillsmatter.com;
      • Your logo (small) on all in-venue conference banners.


    • T-SHIRT SPONSORSHIP
    • Be remembered! Have your logo printed on the #functionalpx t-shirts, provided to all conference attendees, speakers and sponsors attending this year.

      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo on all Functional Programming eXchange t-shirts
      • Exclusive to two t-shirt sponsors only!
    • SPONSOR THE FUNCTIONAL PROGRAMMING EXCHANGE 2015 PARTY!
    • Be remembered by all conference attendees, speakers and sponsors attending the party this year! Have your logo printed on the #functionalpx party beer mats and on highly visible party posters and pop-up banners, which are bound to feature in lots of pictures this year.

      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo displayed on the #functionalpx 2015 party beer mats and on the party table pop-up banners;
      • Five free tickets to the #functionalpx 2015 Party, which you can gift to your clients and team members;
      • Your logo (small) on all in-venue conference banners and on the #functionalpx Sponsor web pages;
      • Your own dedicated partner page on skillsmatter.com;
      • Exclusive to two party sponsors only!
    • SPONSOR THE #FUNCTIONALPX 2015 ATTENDEE BAGS!
    • Be remembered! Have your logo printed on the #functionalpx attendee bags, provided to all conference attendees, speakers and sponsors attending this year.

      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo on all Functional Programming eXchange swag bags
      • Exclusive to two sponsors only!

To discuss sponsorship opportunities please contact the team:

Thanks to our sponsors