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2 DAY CONFERENCE

Haskell eXchange 2017

Topics covered at #haskellX
Book Now: £650 £595 + VAT Book by 6th September and pay just £595!

Thursday, 12th - Friday, 13th October at CodeNode, London

15 experts. will be speaking. Starts at 9:00 AM.

Back for a sixth installment, the Haskell eXchange is an annual conference created for and by the Skills Matter community. An opportunity for Haskellers to meet, learn and share skills, discover emerging technologies and help evolve the Haskell ecosystem. Everyone is welcome to join, whether you are an expert or a beginner, whether you are a commercial user, an academic or a hobbyist, we'd love it if you join us this year at the Haskell eXchange!

Join us at Haskell eXchange London on October 12-13th 2017

The sixth Haskell eXchange returns with more in store for you to learn and discover! Join leading experts in the Haskell realm who will share their ideas and thought processes on all things Haskell. Follow us at #HaskellX for all the latest updates on the conference!

Thank you to all speakers, sponsors and attendees for making Haskell eXchange 2016 a memorable event!

Check out Haskell eXchange 2016's Highlights and Conversations with our experts here!



Breaking news! Simon Peyton Jones comes back to Haskell eXchange 2017!


Join us at Haskell eXchange's sixth edition as the mighty Simon Peyton Jones, one of the major contributors to the design of the Haskell programming language, will be delivering a keynote!

Tickets

Registration is open and we have some great Early Bird offers available so if you are planning to join us for two days packed with Haskell fun, get your skates on and book your ticket today!

Call for Papers now CLOSED - Check out our Programme Page for Updates!

The Call for Papers is now CLOSED! Thanks for submitting a proposal, the response's been overwhelming and we are currently working on selecting talks. Click here to stay up to date and find out more on speakers as we'll start publishing the line-up very soon!

Get Involved

Would you like to help us facilitate a great conference? Help us set up the conference spaces, introduce talks and speakers, field Q&A questions with mics, or support some of the workshops and hacks we've got in store? Sign up as a volunteer and get a free ticket to the conference!

Join us for the HaskellX Bytes evening events at CodeNode

Want to stay in the loop with the latest developments within the Haskell community?

Join us at the brand new Haskell Bytes series we'll be hosting at CodeNode leading up to Haskell eXchange 2017!

Find more information here!

Code of Conduct

Please find our Code of Conduct here.

Impressions of last year

Thanks to our sponsors

New Hasql: Faster and Simpler

In this talk, you will explore a detailed introduction to the Hasql library, the omst efficient Haskell driver for Postgres, core ideas behind it and a tutorial on how to use it.

Nikita Volkov

Nikita is a Haskell expert and the author of multiple packages on Hackage, including such notable projects, as "hasql", "stm-containers", "record".

Individualisation of Extensible Workflows

Imagine you have many small customers with a common problem that can be solved by utilizing a workflow system. This opens a market for a common solution in the form of a process description. However, as customers usually have significant differences in their requirements, the capturing of data and the corresponding logic need individualization. Conventional workflow system fail to address the extensibility of the later part. Indeed, individualisation often boils down to consultants copy&adapting the process descriptions. You know this as a bad engineering practice: such an approach has high maintenance costs and smaller companies cannot afford it.

In this talk, you will see a scalable approach where individualisation boils down to extending a base workflow description. The problem is related to the expression problem, and our approach is based on solutions in this area. In this approach, the workflow is modelled as a data flow graph in contrast to control flow graphs as traditionally used by workflow systems. Such a graph essentially represents a functional reactive program where the nodes correspond to tasks. The tasks will be organized in a tree, and we express the data flow as functions between attributes of this tree. The description of this tree is an example of an attribute grammar, which we can express as EDSL in Haskell using type level programming. Finally, the attribute grammar formalism allows you to compose the workflow description from small transformable fragments, thereby obtaining the desired extensibility.

Arie Middelkoop

Arie Middelkoop did his Ph.D. in the area of Compiler Construction at Universiteit Utrecht, and utilizes attribute grammars and other functional programming concepts for everday programming challenges.

Antidote - Just the Right Kind of Consistency for your Data

You need a data store that allows for high throughput and availability, while supporting just the right kind of consistency?

Current database design forces application developers to decide early in the design cycle, and once and for all, what type of consistency the database should provide. At one extreme, strong consistency requires frequent global coordination; restricting concurrency in this way greatly simplifies application development, but it reduces availability and increases latency. At the opposite extreme, there are systems that provide eventual consistency only: they never sacrifice availability, but application developers must write code to deal with all sorts of concurrency anomalies in order to prevent violation of application invariants.

But a system only needs to be consistent enough for the application to be correct. Antidote, an open-source cloud-scale database operates, on a unique middle ground by providing Just-Right Consistency (JRC). It composes various techniques that do not sacrifice availability, unless provably required for the application to execute correctly, including Conflict-free Replicated Data Types (CRDTs) and causal consistency.

In the talk, you will learn how application developers can benefit from Antidote's features in their Haskell applications.

Annette Bieniusa

Annette is a lecturer and researcher at the University of Kaiserslautern. Her research interests include semantics of concurrent and distributed programming, with a focus on replication, synchronization, and programming language concepts such as Software Transactional Memory and Replicated Data Structures. Annette was involved in several national and international research projects, including EU-Projects “SyncFree: Large-scale Computation without Synchronization” and “Lightkone: Lightweight computation for networks at the edge”.

Distributed Programming with Linear Types

It is a very haskellian thing to do, to solve problems by applying types to them. In this talk, you will learn to do just that, to problems found in distributed programming. The interesting commonality of these problems is that they are not commonly recognised as having a solution in the space of types. From memory management, to fusion, to protocols. You will discover that with an extension to Haskell's type system called linear types you can play dirty tricks you usually associate with C programming and keep your hands clean. The Haskell way.

Arnaud Spiwack

Arnaud Spiwack spend the first 10 years of his working life in Academia, between Chalmers university in Gothenburg, Sweden, and Ecole Polytechnique, Inria, and Mines ParisTech, in the Paris area. He spent this time researching dependent types, computer-verified proof, and sequent calculus. During his time in Academia, Arnaud got involved in the development of the Coq Proof Assistant, where he, in particular, re-engineered Coq's tactic engine and gave it an abstract interface. After leaving academia, he remained a member of the core development team of the Coq Proof Assistant. He is now a senior architect at Tweag I/O, and is working at making the word better typed.

Incremental Computing

Many applications maintain data that evolves over time together with views on this data. An example are GUI applications that present information from a database to the user. Whenever the underlying data changes, the views must adapt to these changes. Incremental computing is about performing such updates efficiently.

In this talk, you will explore the incremental-computing package, which allows you to easily build functions with accompanying support for incremental updates. The package contains specifically crafted update algorithms for a set of core functions like filtering and sorting of lists. From these core functions, you can build more complex functions with the help of easy-to-use combinators, and the incremental-computing package will derive the accompanying incremental update methods for you.

Wolfgang Jeltsch

Wolfgang Jeltsch has been a Haskell enthusiast since 1999. He has used the language in research and development and has taught it to university students.

Algebraic Graphs

Are you tired of fiddling with sets of vertices and edges when working with graphs? Would you like to have a simple tree-like data type for representing graphs and manipulating them using familiar functional programming abstractions? In this talk, you will learn a new way of thinking about graphs and a new approach to working with graphs in a functional programming language like Haskell.

This talk is beginner-friendly. You do not need to know dependent types or category theory, and even functors and monads will appear just as familiar and natural (psst!) graph transformations.

The ideas presented in the talk are implemented in the Alga library.

Andrey Mokhov

Andrey Mokhov is a Lecturer in Computer Engineering at Newcastle University, UK. He is interested in applying formal methods and functional programming to hardware design, with particular focus on asynchronous circuits. In 2015 he was a visiting researcher at Microsoft Research Cambridge redesigning the build system of the Glasgow Haskell Compiler.

Functional Programming with Bananas in Barbed Wire

In your day to day functional programming, you encounter recursion every step of the way. If only there were a way of abstracting away its repetitive parts and clarifying the recursive code with minimal boilerplate!

Fortunately, recursion schemes come to the rescue. They allow for a clear and concise definition of recursion, while being guided by the typechecker. During this talk, you will explore the basic theory behind them but will not require advanced knowledge of mathematics. Recursion schemes can greatly benefit from a more widespread usage and will try to convey the practical ways in which they can be used in real life programs.

Michał Kawalec

Michał is an engineer of many trades. He is currently responsible for libraries and architecture of League of Legends, and, previously, he had worked with startups, supercomputers, and particle detectors. At night, he writes Haskell libraries and runs the biggest Haskell Meetup in Poland.

Static Pointers, Closures and Polymorphism

A static pointer can be thought of as the address of symbol in a program. Their primary use lies in the fact that they can always be serialized and hence sent across a network; thus, while we cannot send a Haskell function over a network, we /can/ send a static pointer to that function. This makes them very useful in distributed frameworks such as Cloud Haskell (an library for Erlang-like distributed programs) and Sparkle (Haskell bindings to the Apache Spark cluster computing framework). In this talk, you will learn how static pointers work, what kind of infrastructure we can define on top to make working with static pointers more practical, and outline some use cases.

Edsko de Vries

Edsko joined Well-Typed as a Haskell Consultant in 2012. He is one of the primary authors of Cloud Haskell and has recently been working on Haskell language infrastructure.Edsko has been using Haskell since 2004, and holds a PhD in substructural type

Workshop: Practical Parser Combinators

Parsers let you read all kinds of interesting data into your program so that you can do stuff with it.

Parser combinator libraries let you create those complex parsers by gluing together simpler parsers.

In this hands on session, you will explore writing some parsers using one of the common Haskell parser combinator libraries (eg Parsec), simple at first but building up to something more complex like parsing part of a network protocol (for example, an HTTP response), or a complex data structure like JSON or XML, or a simple algebraic expression evaluator (depending on audience interest).

This an introductory level session so you don't need much experience in Haskell at all, but you do need a laptop with Haskell installed so that you can try your own code throughout the session.

Ben Clifford

Ben's career has spanned supercomputing, distributed systems, and programming languages, and taken him all across the world from Los Angeles to Johannesburg. Most recently he has been based in London taking Haskell work where he can find it.

Welcome to the Machines

The streaming of data in a purely functional language is a fascinating problem that have been extensively explored over the years.

In this talk, you will briefly explore historical solutions to the problem and discuss their advantages and disadvantages, following that, you will discover a practical introduction to the great machines library from Edward Kmett.

You will learn how the library usage compare to other players in the ecosystem (pipes, conduit, ...), and walk through real world examples giving you a chance to write your own combinators and understand some of the internals.

Signature Inference for Functional Property Discovery

During this talk, you will explore the master thesis on Property discovery. Property has the potential to be the last piece of the puzzle in the Property discovery industry when it comes to testing. Property testing solved the problem with unit testing that you can never think of enough examples.

Property discovery is the next logical step: it could solve the problem of finding which properties to test. The talk will be presented without any assumption of prior knowledge of testing in Haskell, but familiarity with Haskell is assumed and familiarity with QuickCheck may increase the likelihood that you will appreciate the work presented.

Tom Sydney Kerckhove

Tom Sydney Kerckhove recently graduated from ETH Zurich. Originally from Belgium, he traveled between London and Zurich to gather professional experience. He has used Haskell as a hobbyist for years, and recently obtained professonal experience as well.

Can Haskell Do Data Science Yet?

Data science has emerged as "the sexiest job of the 21st century" - but can existing data science infrastructure and ecosystems live up to that title? Many data scientists use dynamically typed languages such as Python, or R. In the Haskell community, you know that functional programming and powerful type systems can deliver massively increased productivity by promoting composition. If this promise is to be projected onto serious, real-world data science, there is remains considerable work to be done for emerging competitive ecosystem.

Tom will briefly outline the data science process and the different kinds of workflows employed, depending on the questions that are asked and the volume and variety of data present. You will learn how, contrary to the common perception, there in fact is a substantial body of work existing in the Haskell open source ecosystem that can solve many of these tasks.

You will focus on two recent projects: combinator libraries predictive analytics and dashboard generation. The R language have mature projects in this area, caret and Shiny respectively. Implementing these projects in Haskell forces us to formalise the types of operations necessary; but this formalisation brings new opportunities in terms of presenting a constructor kit with building block that can be combined in ways that were difficult to imagine in a less formal approach.

Tom Nielsen

Tom is a data science team leader building predictive analytics-based products, specialising in preference learning, visual analytics and marketing using Bayesian and deep learning methods, probabilistic and functional programming. He has a background as an experimental and computational neuroscientist - Tom obtained his PhD in Neuroscience from University College London by pouring slimy stuff on brain cells, which combined with a reaction-diffusion model allowed him to measure biophysical properties of synapses. As a Research Associate at Harvard Medical School, and then the Universities of Leicester and Nottingham, he built microscopes and Domain Specific Languages in Haskell to control them. Working at the intersection of experimental, theoretical and methodological neuroscience has given him a uniquely creative perspective on data science. As the Chief Data Science Officer at a creative social agency, he led a team team building a series of models for predicting and enhancing the impact an image will have in specific marketing contexts using Deep Learning model; attribution modelling from social media data, and a platform for delivering visual consumer advertising on social media. He is now working on an open source data science stack in Haskell.

Fast XML Parsing with Haskell

Haskell has lots of XML parsing libraries, implemented using different techniques, and offering different levels of performance. In this talk, you will learn why, until recently, even the fastest of these libraries was embarrassingly slow compared to state-of-the-art XML parsers. Neil will share how the issue was rectified, with the introduction of the Hexml and Xeno libraries. Hexml uses the Foreign Function Interface (FFI), pushing much of the actual work into C, showing how to move performance sensitive pieces into C and reintegrate them without excessive overhead. In contrast, Xeno is written in pure Haskell, using special development/testing techniques to ensure the optimised code performs comparably to Hexml. You will explore the comparison between these different approaches, and see how they apply beyond just XML parsing.

Neil Mitchell

Neil Mitchell is a Haskell programmer who lives in Cambridge with his wife Emily and his son Henry. Neil has a PhD in Computer Science from York University, working on making functional programs shorter, faster and safer. Since then he's worked with F# at Credit Suisse and Haskell/F#/C++ at Standard Chartered and Barclays, taking the lessons of functional programming and applying them in finance.

Keynote: A Monoid for All Seasons

One of the great things about Haskell is the way it enables us to recognize patterns, give them names, and reuse them. It's been noted before that monoids really are everywhere in programming, but that Haskell gives us more ability to see them than many languages do.

During this talk, you will explore a bit of background in Boolean algebra, focusing on the two fundamental operations, which are generalizations of addition and multiplication, and their identity elements. Julie will extend this to the Monoid typeclass in Haskell and illuminate those Boolean patterns over various types.

Julie will then extend this further, and you will discover how to examine the monoids of conjunction that typically underlie applicative functors and the monoids of disjunction that you find in the Alternative typeclass.

Julie Moronuki

Julie is a linguist and teacher who learned Haskell on a whim.

Looking forward to Simon Peyton Jones hosting a Keynote at #HaskellX 2017!

Simon Peyton Jones

Simon Peyton Jones, MA, MBCS, CEng, graduated from Trinity College Cambridge in 1980. Simon was a key contributor to the design of the now-standard functional language Haskell, and is the lead designer of the widely-used Glasgow Haskell Compiler (GHC). He has written two textbooks about the implementation of functional languages.

CodeNode

In August 2015, Skills Matter opened the doors to CodeNode, our new 23,000 sqft Tech Events and Community venue. CodeNode provides fantastic meetup, conference, training and collaboration spaces with unrivalled technology capabilities for our tech, digital and developer communities - a long held dream coming true !

With fantastic transport links and located in the heart of London's Tech City, we could not think of a better location for our 60,000 strong engineering community!

With seven event rooms, including a 300 seater lecture room, thousands more community members will be able to visit CodeNode to learn and share skills, code and collaborate on projects.

CodeNode features a 5,000 sqft break-out space, complete with fully-licensed bar, plenty of power sockets, meeting and collaboration spaces and entertainment areas.

CodeNode will also see the opening of a permanent Hack Space, stacked with microprocessors and the latest tools and devices to play with. A community film studio will be opening too, which you can use to record any tutorials or demo's you may want to share with our community.

If you're interested in hiring CodeNode for your upcoming event, check out more details here.

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CodeNode

Skills Matter | CodeNode, 10 South Place, London, EC2M 7EB, GB


View details, travel and nearby hotels

Call for Papers is Now CLOSED!

The Call for Papers is now CLOSED! Thanks for submitting a proposal, the response's been overwhelming and we are currently working on selecting talks. Click here to stay up to date and find out more on speakers as we'll start publishing the line-up very soon!

Volunteer at Haskell eXchange 2017!

Want to help us facilitate a great conference? Help us set up the conference spaces, introduce talks and speakers, field Q&A questions with mics, or support some of the workshops and hacks we've got in store? Sign up as a volunteer and get a free ticket to the conference!

We ask all volunteers to help us with the set up of the conference on 11 October (the day before the conference) and and some hours of your time during the conference, for example to compare the talks or help field questions with mics.

If that sounds like fun, email conference@skillsmatter.com and we'll be in touch shortly to sign you up to this year's volunteering team.

Don't want Haskell eXchange to end? Carry it on with Haskell2gether!



Follow up the lessons learned, the ideas sparked and the friendships formed at Haskell eXchange with a weekend full of Haskell community fun!

Whether you're a Haskell n00b or a seasoned vet, an attendee of the weeks previous conference or just looking to engage now - dive on into Haskell2gether for a whole Saturday and Sunday of free hands-on activities.

Join fellow Haskell eXchange attendees and some of the most talented coders and experts, for our new weekend-long Haskell2gether event and create something amazing together!

Participation is free for registered attendees. Register here.

Available Packages

    • 256-BIT SPONSORSHIP
    • Engage with 200 highly experienced and passionate Haskell developers and mathematicians exploring functional programming, Haskell and the Haskell stack! Show off your team, projects, tools or devices at your #HaskellX conference booth!

      Engagement Benefits
      • Your own booth at Haskell eXchange (4.5mx2.5m)
      • 8 Exhibitor Tickets
      • 8 Full Conference Tickets to the conference which you can gift to your clients, your engineering team or members of Computing At School (teachers learning computing to teach the new National Computing Curriculum).
      • Six tweets retweeted by @skillsmatter before and during the conference and highlighted as part of tweets trending with ##haskellX
      • 50 conference party drink tokens to give away at your booth
      • 3 gifts or printed items in swag bags
      • Your 300-word news item, interview or blog post - plus visual - announced on conference 'Sneak Preview' pages and in social media
      • Your 140 char post-conference news item & hotlinked URL shared in post-conference email shared with all attendees
      • 4 places at speakers dinner
      • The opportunity to set one of the Haskell Hack Challenges and award a prize to the winner of your challenge
      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo (extra large) on all Haskell eXchange sponsor pages
      • Your own dedicated partner page on skillsmatter.com
      • Your logo (extra large) at the bottom of all Haskell eXchange conference pages
      • Your logo on Haskell Bytes Meetup pages, which feature monthly community events leading up to the conference
      • Your logo in pre-and post conference attendee news update emails
      • Your logo on name badges worn by every attendee
      • Your logo in the printed conference program booklet
      • Your logo on main stage re-boards and banners throughout the venue
      • Your logo on conference closing speech sponsor 'thank you' slide
      • Your logo on conference swag bags
      • Your logo on lanyrds worn by every attendee
      • Your logo on conference t-shirt
      • Your logo on Haskell eXchange party tickets
      • Your logo on Haskell eXchange beer mats
      • Your logo on Haskell eXchange party banners
    • 128-BIT SPONSORSHIP
    • Engagement Benefits
      • Your own booth at Haskell eXchange (3mx1.5m)
      • 6 Exhibitor Tickets
      • 6 Full Conference Tickets to the conference which you can gift to your clients, your engineering team or members of Computing At School (teachers learning computing to teach the new National Computing Curriculum).
      • Two tweets retweeted by @skillsmatter before and during the conference and highlighted as part of tweets trending with ##haskellX
      • 10 conference party drink tokens to give away at your booth
      • 2 gifts or printed items in swag bags
      • Your 300-word news item, interview or blog post - plus visual - announced on conference 'Sneak Preview' pages and in social media
      • Your 140 char post-conference news item & hotlinked URL shared in post-conference email shared with all attendees
      • 2 places at speakers dinner
      • The opportunity to set one of the Haskell Hack Challenges and award a prize to the winner of your challenge
      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo (large) on all Haskell eXchange sponsor pages
      • Your own dedicated partner page on skillsmatter.com
      • Your logo (large) at the bottom of all Haskell eXchange conference pages
      • Your logo on Haskell Bytes Meetup pages, which feature monthly community events leading up to the conference
      • Your logo in pre-and post conference attendee news update emails
      • Your logo on name badges worn by every attendee
      • Your logo in the printed conference program booklet
      • Your logo on main stage re-boards and banners throughout the venue
      • Your logo on conference closing speech sponsor 'thank you' slide
      • Your logo on conference swag bags
      • Your logo on Haskell eXchange party tickets
      • Your logo on Haskell eXchange beer mats
    • 64-BIT SPONSORSHIP
    • Engagement Benefits #####
      • Your own booth at Haskell eXchange (1.5mx1.5m)
      • 4 Exhibitor Tickets
      • 4 Full Conference Tickets to the conference which you can gift to your clients, your engineering team or members of Computing At School (teachers learning computing to teach the new National Computing Curriculum).
      • Two tweets retweeted by @skillsmatter before and during the conference and highlighted as part of tweets trending with ##haskellX
      • 10 conference party drink tokens to give away at your booth
      • 1 gift or printed item in swag bags
      • Your 300-word news item, interview or blog post - plus visual - announced on conference 'Sneak Preview' pages and in social media
      • Your 140 char post-conference news item & hotlinked URL shared in post-conference email shared with all attendees
      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo (medium) on all Haskell eXchange sponsor pages
      • Your own dedicated partner page on skillsmatter.com
      • Your logo (medium) at the bottom of all Haskell eXchange conference pages
      • Your logo on Haskell Bytes Meetup pages, which feature monthly community events leading up to the conference
      • Your logo in pre-and post conference attendee news update emails
      • Your logo on name badges worn by every attendee
      • Your logo in the printed conference program booklet
      • Your logo on main stage re-boards and banners throughout the venue
      • Your logo on conference closing speech sponsor 'thank you' slide
    • 32-BIT SPONSORSHIP
    • Engagement Benefits
      • Your own flipchart at Haskell eXchange
      • 2 Exhibitor Tickets
      • 2 Full Conference Tickets to the conference which you can gift to your clients, your engineering team or members of Computing At School (teachers learning computing to teach the new National Computing Curriculum).
      • One tweet retweeted by @skillsmatter before and during the conference and highlighted as part of tweets trending with ##haskellX
      • 1 gift or printed item in swag bags
      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo (small) on all Haskell eXchange sponsor pages
      • Your own dedicated partner page on skillsmatter.com
      • Your logo (small) at the bottom of all Haskell eXchange conference pages
      • Your logo in pre-and post conference attendee news update emails
      • Your logo on name badges worn by every attendee
      • Your logo in the printed conference program booklet
      • Your logo on main stage re-boards and banners throughout the venue
      • Your logo on conference closing speech sponsor 'thank you' slide
    • SPONSOR THE HASKELL EXCHANGE 2017 ATTENDEE BAGS!
    • Be remembered! Have your logo printed on all #HaskellX swag bags, provided to conference attendees, speakers and sponsors attending this year.

      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo on 150 #HaskellX swag bags
      • Exclusive to two swag bag sponsors only!
    • 16-BIT SPONSORSHIP
    • Engagement Benefits
      • 1 Exhibitor Tickets
      • 1 gift or printed item in swag bags
      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo (extra small) on all Haskell eXchange sponsor pages
      • Your own dedicated partner page on skillsmatter.com
      • Your logo (extra small) at the bottom of all Haskell eXchange conference pages
      • Your logo on name badges worn by every attendee
      • Your logo in the printed conference program booklet
      • Your logo on main stage re-boards and banners throughout the venue


    • SPONSOR THE HASKELL EXCHANGE 2017 PARTY!
    • Be remembered by all conference attendees, speakers and sponsors attending the party this year! Have your logo printed on the Haskell eXchange 2017 Party beer mats and on highly visible party posters and pop-up banners, which are bound to feature in lots of pictures this year.

      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo displayed on the #HaskellX 2017 party beer mats and on the party table pop-up banners;
      • Five free tickets to the #HaskellX 2017 Party, which you can gift to your clients and team members;
      • Your logo (small) on all in-venue conference banners and on the #HaskellX 2017 Sponsor web pages;
      • Your own dedicated partner page on skillsmatter.com;
      • Exclusive to two party sponsors only!
    • T-SHIRT SPONSORSHIP
    • Be remembered! Have your logo printed on all #HaskellX t-shirts, provided to conference attendees, speakers and sponsors attending this year.

      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo on all #HaskellX t-shirts
      • Exclusive to two t-shirt sponsors only!

To discuss sponsorship opportunities please contact the team:

Thanks to our sponsors

Hold tight, skillscasts coming soon!

 

Overview

Back for a sixth installment, the Haskell eXchange is an annual conference created for and by the Skills Matter community. An opportunity for Haskellers to meet, learn and share skills, discover emerging technologies and help evolve the Haskell ecosystem. Everyone is welcome to join, whether you are an expert or a beginner, whether you are a commercial user, an academic or a hobbyist, we'd love it if you join us this year at the Haskell eXchange!

Join us at Haskell eXchange London on October 12-13th 2017

The sixth Haskell eXchange returns with more in store for you to learn and discover! Join leading experts in the Haskell realm who will share their ideas and thought processes on all things Haskell. Follow us at #HaskellX for all the latest updates on the conference!

Thank you to all speakers, sponsors and attendees for making Haskell eXchange 2016 a memorable event!

Check out Haskell eXchange 2016's Highlights and Conversations with our experts here!



Breaking news! Simon Peyton Jones comes back to Haskell eXchange 2017!


Join us at Haskell eXchange's sixth edition as the mighty Simon Peyton Jones, one of the major contributors to the design of the Haskell programming language, will be delivering a keynote!

Tickets

Registration is open and we have some great Early Bird offers available so if you are planning to join us for two days packed with Haskell fun, get your skates on and book your ticket today!

Call for Papers now CLOSED - Check out our Programme Page for Updates!

The Call for Papers is now CLOSED! Thanks for submitting a proposal, the response's been overwhelming and we are currently working on selecting talks. Click here to stay up to date and find out more on speakers as we'll start publishing the line-up very soon!

Get Involved

Would you like to help us facilitate a great conference? Help us set up the conference spaces, introduce talks and speakers, field Q&A questions with mics, or support some of the workshops and hacks we've got in store? Sign up as a volunteer and get a free ticket to the conference!

Join us for the HaskellX Bytes evening events at CodeNode

Want to stay in the loop with the latest developments within the Haskell community?

Join us at the brand new Haskell Bytes series we'll be hosting at CodeNode leading up to Haskell eXchange 2017!

Find more information here!

Code of Conduct

Please find our Code of Conduct here.

Impressions of last year

Thanks to our sponsors

Programme

New Hasql: Faster and Simpler

In this talk, you will explore a detailed introduction to the Hasql library, the omst efficient Haskell driver for Postgres, core ideas behind it and a tutorial on how to use it.

Nikita Volkov

Nikita is a Haskell expert and the author of multiple packages on Hackage, including such notable projects, as "hasql", "stm-containers", "record".

Individualisation of Extensible Workflows

Imagine you have many small customers with a common problem that can be solved by utilizing a workflow system. This opens a market for a common solution in the form of a process description. However, as customers usually have significant differences in their requirements, the capturing of data and the corresponding logic need individualization. Conventional workflow system fail to address the extensibility of the later part. Indeed, individualisation often boils down to consultants copy&adapting the process descriptions. You know this as a bad engineering practice: such an approach has high maintenance costs and smaller companies cannot afford it.

In this talk, you will see a scalable approach where individualisation boils down to extending a base workflow description. The problem is related to the expression problem, and our approach is based on solutions in this area. In this approach, the workflow is modelled as a data flow graph in contrast to control flow graphs as traditionally used by workflow systems. Such a graph essentially represents a functional reactive program where the nodes correspond to tasks. The tasks will be organized in a tree, and we express the data flow as functions between attributes of this tree. The description of this tree is an example of an attribute grammar, which we can express as EDSL in Haskell using type level programming. Finally, the attribute grammar formalism allows you to compose the workflow description from small transformable fragments, thereby obtaining the desired extensibility.

Arie Middelkoop

Arie Middelkoop did his Ph.D. in the area of Compiler Construction at Universiteit Utrecht, and utilizes attribute grammars and other functional programming concepts for everday programming challenges.

Antidote - Just the Right Kind of Consistency for your Data

You need a data store that allows for high throughput and availability, while supporting just the right kind of consistency?

Current database design forces application developers to decide early in the design cycle, and once and for all, what type of consistency the database should provide. At one extreme, strong consistency requires frequent global coordination; restricting concurrency in this way greatly simplifies application development, but it reduces availability and increases latency. At the opposite extreme, there are systems that provide eventual consistency only: they never sacrifice availability, but application developers must write code to deal with all sorts of concurrency anomalies in order to prevent violation of application invariants.

But a system only needs to be consistent enough for the application to be correct. Antidote, an open-source cloud-scale database operates, on a unique middle ground by providing Just-Right Consistency (JRC). It composes various techniques that do not sacrifice availability, unless provably required for the application to execute correctly, including Conflict-free Replicated Data Types (CRDTs) and causal consistency.

In the talk, you will learn how application developers can benefit from Antidote's features in their Haskell applications.

Annette Bieniusa

Annette is a lecturer and researcher at the University of Kaiserslautern. Her research interests include semantics of concurrent and distributed programming, with a focus on replication, synchronization, and programming language concepts such as Software Transactional Memory and Replicated Data Structures. Annette was involved in several national and international research projects, including EU-Projects “SyncFree: Large-scale Computation without Synchronization” and “Lightkone: Lightweight computation for networks at the edge”.

Distributed Programming with Linear Types

It is a very haskellian thing to do, to solve problems by applying types to them. In this talk, you will learn to do just that, to problems found in distributed programming. The interesting commonality of these problems is that they are not commonly recognised as having a solution in the space of types. From memory management, to fusion, to protocols. You will discover that with an extension to Haskell's type system called linear types you can play dirty tricks you usually associate with C programming and keep your hands clean. The Haskell way.

Arnaud Spiwack

Arnaud Spiwack spend the first 10 years of his working life in Academia, between Chalmers university in Gothenburg, Sweden, and Ecole Polytechnique, Inria, and Mines ParisTech, in the Paris area. He spent this time researching dependent types, computer-verified proof, and sequent calculus. During his time in Academia, Arnaud got involved in the development of the Coq Proof Assistant, where he, in particular, re-engineered Coq's tactic engine and gave it an abstract interface. After leaving academia, he remained a member of the core development team of the Coq Proof Assistant. He is now a senior architect at Tweag I/O, and is working at making the word better typed.

Incremental Computing

Many applications maintain data that evolves over time together with views on this data. An example are GUI applications that present information from a database to the user. Whenever the underlying data changes, the views must adapt to these changes. Incremental computing is about performing such updates efficiently.

In this talk, you will explore the incremental-computing package, which allows you to easily build functions with accompanying support for incremental updates. The package contains specifically crafted update algorithms for a set of core functions like filtering and sorting of lists. From these core functions, you can build more complex functions with the help of easy-to-use combinators, and the incremental-computing package will derive the accompanying incremental update methods for you.

Wolfgang Jeltsch

Wolfgang Jeltsch has been a Haskell enthusiast since 1999. He has used the language in research and development and has taught it to university students.

Algebraic Graphs

Are you tired of fiddling with sets of vertices and edges when working with graphs? Would you like to have a simple tree-like data type for representing graphs and manipulating them using familiar functional programming abstractions? In this talk, you will learn a new way of thinking about graphs and a new approach to working with graphs in a functional programming language like Haskell.

This talk is beginner-friendly. You do not need to know dependent types or category theory, and even functors and monads will appear just as familiar and natural (psst!) graph transformations.

The ideas presented in the talk are implemented in the Alga library.

Andrey Mokhov

Andrey Mokhov is a Lecturer in Computer Engineering at Newcastle University, UK. He is interested in applying formal methods and functional programming to hardware design, with particular focus on asynchronous circuits. In 2015 he was a visiting researcher at Microsoft Research Cambridge redesigning the build system of the Glasgow Haskell Compiler.

Functional Programming with Bananas in Barbed Wire

In your day to day functional programming, you encounter recursion every step of the way. If only there were a way of abstracting away its repetitive parts and clarifying the recursive code with minimal boilerplate!

Fortunately, recursion schemes come to the rescue. They allow for a clear and concise definition of recursion, while being guided by the typechecker. During this talk, you will explore the basic theory behind them but will not require advanced knowledge of mathematics. Recursion schemes can greatly benefit from a more widespread usage and will try to convey the practical ways in which they can be used in real life programs.

Michał Kawalec

Michał is an engineer of many trades. He is currently responsible for libraries and architecture of League of Legends, and, previously, he had worked with startups, supercomputers, and particle detectors. At night, he writes Haskell libraries and runs the biggest Haskell Meetup in Poland.

Static Pointers, Closures and Polymorphism

A static pointer can be thought of as the address of symbol in a program. Their primary use lies in the fact that they can always be serialized and hence sent across a network; thus, while we cannot send a Haskell function over a network, we /can/ send a static pointer to that function. This makes them very useful in distributed frameworks such as Cloud Haskell (an library for Erlang-like distributed programs) and Sparkle (Haskell bindings to the Apache Spark cluster computing framework). In this talk, you will learn how static pointers work, what kind of infrastructure we can define on top to make working with static pointers more practical, and outline some use cases.

Edsko de Vries

Edsko joined Well-Typed as a Haskell Consultant in 2012. He is one of the primary authors of Cloud Haskell and has recently been working on Haskell language infrastructure.Edsko has been using Haskell since 2004, and holds a PhD in substructural type

Workshop: Practical Parser Combinators

Parsers let you read all kinds of interesting data into your program so that you can do stuff with it.

Parser combinator libraries let you create those complex parsers by gluing together simpler parsers.

In this hands on session, you will explore writing some parsers using one of the common Haskell parser combinator libraries (eg Parsec), simple at first but building up to something more complex like parsing part of a network protocol (for example, an HTTP response), or a complex data structure like JSON or XML, or a simple algebraic expression evaluator (depending on audience interest).

This an introductory level session so you don't need much experience in Haskell at all, but you do need a laptop with Haskell installed so that you can try your own code throughout the session.

Ben Clifford

Ben's career has spanned supercomputing, distributed systems, and programming languages, and taken him all across the world from Los Angeles to Johannesburg. Most recently he has been based in London taking Haskell work where he can find it.

Welcome to the Machines

The streaming of data in a purely functional language is a fascinating problem that have been extensively explored over the years.

In this talk, you will briefly explore historical solutions to the problem and discuss their advantages and disadvantages, following that, you will discover a practical introduction to the great machines library from Edward Kmett.

You will learn how the library usage compare to other players in the ecosystem (pipes, conduit, ...), and walk through real world examples giving you a chance to write your own combinators and understand some of the internals.

Signature Inference for Functional Property Discovery

During this talk, you will explore the master thesis on Property discovery. Property has the potential to be the last piece of the puzzle in the Property discovery industry when it comes to testing. Property testing solved the problem with unit testing that you can never think of enough examples.

Property discovery is the next logical step: it could solve the problem of finding which properties to test. The talk will be presented without any assumption of prior knowledge of testing in Haskell, but familiarity with Haskell is assumed and familiarity with QuickCheck may increase the likelihood that you will appreciate the work presented.

Tom Sydney Kerckhove

Tom Sydney Kerckhove recently graduated from ETH Zurich. Originally from Belgium, he traveled between London and Zurich to gather professional experience. He has used Haskell as a hobbyist for years, and recently obtained professonal experience as well.

Can Haskell Do Data Science Yet?

Data science has emerged as "the sexiest job of the 21st century" - but can existing data science infrastructure and ecosystems live up to that title? Many data scientists use dynamically typed languages such as Python, or R. In the Haskell community, you know that functional programming and powerful type systems can deliver massively increased productivity by promoting composition. If this promise is to be projected onto serious, real-world data science, there is remains considerable work to be done for emerging competitive ecosystem.

Tom will briefly outline the data science process and the different kinds of workflows employed, depending on the questions that are asked and the volume and variety of data present. You will learn how, contrary to the common perception, there in fact is a substantial body of work existing in the Haskell open source ecosystem that can solve many of these tasks.

You will focus on two recent projects: combinator libraries predictive analytics and dashboard generation. The R language have mature projects in this area, caret and Shiny respectively. Implementing these projects in Haskell forces us to formalise the types of operations necessary; but this formalisation brings new opportunities in terms of presenting a constructor kit with building block that can be combined in ways that were difficult to imagine in a less formal approach.

Tom Nielsen

Tom is a data science team leader building predictive analytics-based products, specialising in preference learning, visual analytics and marketing using Bayesian and deep learning methods, probabilistic and functional programming. He has a background as an experimental and computational neuroscientist - Tom obtained his PhD in Neuroscience from University College London by pouring slimy stuff on brain cells, which combined with a reaction-diffusion model allowed him to measure biophysical properties of synapses. As a Research Associate at Harvard Medical School, and then the Universities of Leicester and Nottingham, he built microscopes and Domain Specific Languages in Haskell to control them. Working at the intersection of experimental, theoretical and methodological neuroscience has given him a uniquely creative perspective on data science. As the Chief Data Science Officer at a creative social agency, he led a team team building a series of models for predicting and enhancing the impact an image will have in specific marketing contexts using Deep Learning model; attribution modelling from social media data, and a platform for delivering visual consumer advertising on social media. He is now working on an open source data science stack in Haskell.

Fast XML Parsing with Haskell

Haskell has lots of XML parsing libraries, implemented using different techniques, and offering different levels of performance. In this talk, you will learn why, until recently, even the fastest of these libraries was embarrassingly slow compared to state-of-the-art XML parsers. Neil will share how the issue was rectified, with the introduction of the Hexml and Xeno libraries. Hexml uses the Foreign Function Interface (FFI), pushing much of the actual work into C, showing how to move performance sensitive pieces into C and reintegrate them without excessive overhead. In contrast, Xeno is written in pure Haskell, using special development/testing techniques to ensure the optimised code performs comparably to Hexml. You will explore the comparison between these different approaches, and see how they apply beyond just XML parsing.

Neil Mitchell

Neil Mitchell is a Haskell programmer who lives in Cambridge with his wife Emily and his son Henry. Neil has a PhD in Computer Science from York University, working on making functional programs shorter, faster and safer. Since then he's worked with F# at Credit Suisse and Haskell/F#/C++ at Standard Chartered and Barclays, taking the lessons of functional programming and applying them in finance.

Keynote: A Monoid for All Seasons

One of the great things about Haskell is the way it enables us to recognize patterns, give them names, and reuse them. It's been noted before that monoids really are everywhere in programming, but that Haskell gives us more ability to see them than many languages do.

During this talk, you will explore a bit of background in Boolean algebra, focusing on the two fundamental operations, which are generalizations of addition and multiplication, and their identity elements. Julie will extend this to the Monoid typeclass in Haskell and illuminate those Boolean patterns over various types.

Julie will then extend this further, and you will discover how to examine the monoids of conjunction that typically underlie applicative functors and the monoids of disjunction that you find in the Alternative typeclass.

Julie Moronuki

Julie is a linguist and teacher who learned Haskell on a whim.

Looking forward to Simon Peyton Jones hosting a Keynote at #HaskellX 2017!

Simon Peyton Jones

Simon Peyton Jones, MA, MBCS, CEng, graduated from Trinity College Cambridge in 1980. Simon was a key contributor to the design of the now-standard functional language Haskell, and is the lead designer of the widely-used Glasgow Haskell Compiler (GHC). He has written two textbooks about the implementation of functional languages.

Venue

CodeNode

In August 2015, Skills Matter opened the doors to CodeNode, our new 23,000 sqft Tech Events and Community venue. CodeNode provides fantastic meetup, conference, training and collaboration spaces with unrivalled technology capabilities for our tech, digital and developer communities - a long held dream coming true !

With fantastic transport links and located in the heart of London's Tech City, we could not think of a better location for our 60,000 strong engineering community!

With seven event rooms, including a 300 seater lecture room, thousands more community members will be able to visit CodeNode to learn and share skills, code and collaborate on projects.

CodeNode features a 5,000 sqft break-out space, complete with fully-licensed bar, plenty of power sockets, meeting and collaboration spaces and entertainment areas.

CodeNode will also see the opening of a permanent Hack Space, stacked with microprocessors and the latest tools and devices to play with. A community film studio will be opening too, which you can use to record any tutorials or demo's you may want to share with our community.

If you're interested in hiring CodeNode for your upcoming event, check out more details here.

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CodeNode

Skills Matter | CodeNode, 10 South Place, London, EC2M 7EB, GB


View details, travel and nearby hotels
Get Involved

Call for Papers is Now CLOSED!

The Call for Papers is now CLOSED! Thanks for submitting a proposal, the response's been overwhelming and we are currently working on selecting talks. Click here to stay up to date and find out more on speakers as we'll start publishing the line-up very soon!

Volunteer at Haskell eXchange 2017!

Want to help us facilitate a great conference? Help us set up the conference spaces, introduce talks and speakers, field Q&A questions with mics, or support some of the workshops and hacks we've got in store? Sign up as a volunteer and get a free ticket to the conference!

We ask all volunteers to help us with the set up of the conference on 11 October (the day before the conference) and and some hours of your time during the conference, for example to compare the talks or help field questions with mics.

If that sounds like fun, email conference@skillsmatter.com and we'll be in touch shortly to sign you up to this year's volunteering team.

Fringe

Don't want Haskell eXchange to end? Carry it on with Haskell2gether!



Follow up the lessons learned, the ideas sparked and the friendships formed at Haskell eXchange with a weekend full of Haskell community fun!

Whether you're a Haskell n00b or a seasoned vet, an attendee of the weeks previous conference or just looking to engage now - dive on into Haskell2gether for a whole Saturday and Sunday of free hands-on activities.

Join fellow Haskell eXchange attendees and some of the most talented coders and experts, for our new weekend-long Haskell2gether event and create something amazing together!

Participation is free for registered attendees. Register here.

Sponsors

Thanks to our sponsors

Available Packages

    • 256-BIT SPONSORSHIP
    • Engage with 200 highly experienced and passionate Haskell developers and mathematicians exploring functional programming, Haskell and the Haskell stack! Show off your team, projects, tools or devices at your #HaskellX conference booth!

      Engagement Benefits
      • Your own booth at Haskell eXchange (4.5mx2.5m)
      • 8 Exhibitor Tickets
      • 8 Full Conference Tickets to the conference which you can gift to your clients, your engineering team or members of Computing At School (teachers learning computing to teach the new National Computing Curriculum).
      • Six tweets retweeted by @skillsmatter before and during the conference and highlighted as part of tweets trending with ##haskellX
      • 50 conference party drink tokens to give away at your booth
      • 3 gifts or printed items in swag bags
      • Your 300-word news item, interview or blog post - plus visual - announced on conference 'Sneak Preview' pages and in social media
      • Your 140 char post-conference news item & hotlinked URL shared in post-conference email shared with all attendees
      • 4 places at speakers dinner
      • The opportunity to set one of the Haskell Hack Challenges and award a prize to the winner of your challenge
      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo (extra large) on all Haskell eXchange sponsor pages
      • Your own dedicated partner page on skillsmatter.com
      • Your logo (extra large) at the bottom of all Haskell eXchange conference pages
      • Your logo on Haskell Bytes Meetup pages, which feature monthly community events leading up to the conference
      • Your logo in pre-and post conference attendee news update emails
      • Your logo on name badges worn by every attendee
      • Your logo in the printed conference program booklet
      • Your logo on main stage re-boards and banners throughout the venue
      • Your logo on conference closing speech sponsor 'thank you' slide
      • Your logo on conference swag bags
      • Your logo on lanyrds worn by every attendee
      • Your logo on conference t-shirt
      • Your logo on Haskell eXchange party tickets
      • Your logo on Haskell eXchange beer mats
      • Your logo on Haskell eXchange party banners
    • 128-BIT SPONSORSHIP
    • Engagement Benefits
      • Your own booth at Haskell eXchange (3mx1.5m)
      • 6 Exhibitor Tickets
      • 6 Full Conference Tickets to the conference which you can gift to your clients, your engineering team or members of Computing At School (teachers learning computing to teach the new National Computing Curriculum).
      • Two tweets retweeted by @skillsmatter before and during the conference and highlighted as part of tweets trending with ##haskellX
      • 10 conference party drink tokens to give away at your booth
      • 2 gifts or printed items in swag bags
      • Your 300-word news item, interview or blog post - plus visual - announced on conference 'Sneak Preview' pages and in social media
      • Your 140 char post-conference news item & hotlinked URL shared in post-conference email shared with all attendees
      • 2 places at speakers dinner
      • The opportunity to set one of the Haskell Hack Challenges and award a prize to the winner of your challenge
      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo (large) on all Haskell eXchange sponsor pages
      • Your own dedicated partner page on skillsmatter.com
      • Your logo (large) at the bottom of all Haskell eXchange conference pages
      • Your logo on Haskell Bytes Meetup pages, which feature monthly community events leading up to the conference
      • Your logo in pre-and post conference attendee news update emails
      • Your logo on name badges worn by every attendee
      • Your logo in the printed conference program booklet
      • Your logo on main stage re-boards and banners throughout the venue
      • Your logo on conference closing speech sponsor 'thank you' slide
      • Your logo on conference swag bags
      • Your logo on Haskell eXchange party tickets
      • Your logo on Haskell eXchange beer mats
    • 64-BIT SPONSORSHIP
    • Engagement Benefits #####
      • Your own booth at Haskell eXchange (1.5mx1.5m)
      • 4 Exhibitor Tickets
      • 4 Full Conference Tickets to the conference which you can gift to your clients, your engineering team or members of Computing At School (teachers learning computing to teach the new National Computing Curriculum).
      • Two tweets retweeted by @skillsmatter before and during the conference and highlighted as part of tweets trending with ##haskellX
      • 10 conference party drink tokens to give away at your booth
      • 1 gift or printed item in swag bags
      • Your 300-word news item, interview or blog post - plus visual - announced on conference 'Sneak Preview' pages and in social media
      • Your 140 char post-conference news item & hotlinked URL shared in post-conference email shared with all attendees
      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo (medium) on all Haskell eXchange sponsor pages
      • Your own dedicated partner page on skillsmatter.com
      • Your logo (medium) at the bottom of all Haskell eXchange conference pages
      • Your logo on Haskell Bytes Meetup pages, which feature monthly community events leading up to the conference
      • Your logo in pre-and post conference attendee news update emails
      • Your logo on name badges worn by every attendee
      • Your logo in the printed conference program booklet
      • Your logo on main stage re-boards and banners throughout the venue
      • Your logo on conference closing speech sponsor 'thank you' slide
    • 32-BIT SPONSORSHIP
    • Engagement Benefits
      • Your own flipchart at Haskell eXchange
      • 2 Exhibitor Tickets
      • 2 Full Conference Tickets to the conference which you can gift to your clients, your engineering team or members of Computing At School (teachers learning computing to teach the new National Computing Curriculum).
      • One tweet retweeted by @skillsmatter before and during the conference and highlighted as part of tweets trending with ##haskellX
      • 1 gift or printed item in swag bags
      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo (small) on all Haskell eXchange sponsor pages
      • Your own dedicated partner page on skillsmatter.com
      • Your logo (small) at the bottom of all Haskell eXchange conference pages
      • Your logo in pre-and post conference attendee news update emails
      • Your logo on name badges worn by every attendee
      • Your logo in the printed conference program booklet
      • Your logo on main stage re-boards and banners throughout the venue
      • Your logo on conference closing speech sponsor 'thank you' slide
    • SPONSOR THE HASKELL EXCHANGE 2017 ATTENDEE BAGS!
    • Be remembered! Have your logo printed on all #HaskellX swag bags, provided to conference attendees, speakers and sponsors attending this year.

      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo on 150 #HaskellX swag bags
      • Exclusive to two swag bag sponsors only!
    • 16-BIT SPONSORSHIP
    • Engagement Benefits
      • 1 Exhibitor Tickets
      • 1 gift or printed item in swag bags
      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo (extra small) on all Haskell eXchange sponsor pages
      • Your own dedicated partner page on skillsmatter.com
      • Your logo (extra small) at the bottom of all Haskell eXchange conference pages
      • Your logo on name badges worn by every attendee
      • Your logo in the printed conference program booklet
      • Your logo on main stage re-boards and banners throughout the venue


    • SPONSOR THE HASKELL EXCHANGE 2017 PARTY!
    • Be remembered by all conference attendees, speakers and sponsors attending the party this year! Have your logo printed on the Haskell eXchange 2017 Party beer mats and on highly visible party posters and pop-up banners, which are bound to feature in lots of pictures this year.

      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo displayed on the #HaskellX 2017 party beer mats and on the party table pop-up banners;
      • Five free tickets to the #HaskellX 2017 Party, which you can gift to your clients and team members;
      • Your logo (small) on all in-venue conference banners and on the #HaskellX 2017 Sponsor web pages;
      • Your own dedicated partner page on skillsmatter.com;
      • Exclusive to two party sponsors only!
    • T-SHIRT SPONSORSHIP
    • Be remembered! Have your logo printed on all #HaskellX t-shirts, provided to conference attendees, speakers and sponsors attending this year.

      Brand Visibility Benefits
      • Your logo on all #HaskellX t-shirts
      • Exclusive to two t-shirt sponsors only!

To discuss sponsorship opportunities please contact the team:

Skillscasts

Hold tight, skillscasts coming soon!

 

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