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4 DAY CONFERENCE

ACCU 2011

Topics covered at #accu11

Wednesday, 13th - Saturday, 16th April at Oxford Barceló Hotel, Oxford

14 experts. will be speaking. Starts at 9:30 AM.

ACCU Conference is the the annual conference of the Association of C and C++ Users, which takes place in Oxford in April every year. The conference digs deep into software development, software architecture and programming culture and programming practices.

Advanced Simplicity

Giles Colborne, Author of Simple and Usable: web mobile and interaction design talks about the challenges of designing for a mainstream audience and why consumers are far more demanding than experts.

Giles Colborne

Giles Colborne is author of Simple and Usable Web Mobile and Interaction Designpublished by New Riders in September 2010. He has been working in usability and user centred design since 1991.

Move Semantics,Perfect Forwarding, and Rvalue references

This session explains what move semantics is, how it affects program performance, and how programmers can control it. It also examines another new C++0x feature, perfect forwarding, because effective use of move semantics takes advantage of it.

Scott Meyers

Scott Meyers is one of the world's foremost authorities on C++. He wrote the best-selling Effective C++ series (Effective C++, More Effective C++, and Effective STL) and recently published training materials on C++0x and on using C++ in embedded syst

Defensive Programming Done Right

In this talk, we begin by reviewing the basic concepts of Design-By-Contract (DbC), and what we mean by the term "Defensive Programming" (DP). We then explore our overall approach to institutionalizing defensive programming in robust reusable library software such that each application can conveniently specify both the runtime budget and also the specific action to be taken.

John Lakos

John Lakos, author of "Large Scale C++ Software Design.", serves at Bloomberg LP in New York City as a senior architect and mentor for C++ Software Development world-wide.

On Our Ability To Do Much

Michael Feathers is an active member of the Agile/XP community. As a contribution to this community, he developed and maintains the CPPUnit — an open source C++ port of the JUnit testing framework. He is a member of the ACM and IEEE. He regularly speaks at software conferences around the world and has been the acting chair for the Codefest event at the last three OOPSLA conferences.

Michael C. Feathers

Michael Feathers is the founder and Director of R7K Research & Conveyance, a company specializing in software and organization design.

Optimizing for Happiness

The way traditional businesses approach the management and organization of creative, intellectual workers is wrong. By throwing away everything that blocks productivity (meetings, deadlines, managers, titles, strict vacation policies, etc) and treating your employees as the responsible adults that they are, potential can be unlocked and employee happiness and retention can be increased.

Tom Preston-Werner

Tom Preston-Werner is a cofounder of GitHub, the social coding phenomenon that has captured the imaginations of hackers around the globe.

Mastering Git Basics

This talk focuses on mastering the commands that comprise 90% of the functionality in Git you use on a day-to-day basis, including installing Git on your favorite platform. Next up is creating local repositories, staging/adding files, making commits, and viewing history. From there you'll learn to share your repositories with others via GitHub, fetch and merge changes that others make, and resolve conflicts.

Tom Preston-Werner

Tom Preston-Werner is a cofounder of GitHub, the social coding phenomenon that has captured the imaginations of hackers around the globe.

Some objects are more equal than others - the many meanings of equality, value and identity

We look at the slippery concepts of equality, value and identity in programming and discuss what pitfalls there are in using them. This is important in e.g. database persistence and reliable unit tests, and is a 'key' issue when you are working with associative collections.

Roger Orr

I have over 20 years experience in IT, using a variety of languages and platforms and have experienced working for a number of different companies over the years. In 1989 I became a contract computer programmer and have successfully managed to remain

Steve Love

Steve Love is a contractor who likes the idea of making shiny new C# applications talk to old grotty C++ ones. He'd prefer to be working on the shiny new stuff, but currently gets to do old grotty legacy C++.

CPU Caches and Why You Care

This session provides a wide-ranging overview of your CPU caches, how they operate, and how that affects high-level decisions on things like data structures and traversal strategies. Both single- and multi-threaded execution are considered.

Scott Meyers

Scott Meyers is one of the world's foremost authorities on C++. He wrote the best-selling Effective C++ series (Effective C++, More Effective C++, and Effective STL) and recently published training materials on C++0x and on using C++ in embedded syst

Good Enough is the enemy of the Good

We spend too much of our working lives coping with inadequate systems on inappropriate kit. We are reassured that this is acceptable because we must "deliver value" and not be "perfectionist". This is just wrong. We've seen teams that have achieved orders of magnitude more effectiveness than their neighbours, not by cutting corners or superhuman effort but by "getting it right".

Nat Pryce

Nat Pryce is a co-author of Growing Object­-Oriented Software Guided by Tests. An early adopter of XP, he has written or contributed to several open source libraries and tools that support TDD and was one of the founding organizers of the London XP Day conference.

Steve Freeman

Steve was a pioneer of Agile software development in the UK, he has built applications for banks, ISPs, financial data providers, and specialist software companies. He has given training courses in Europe, America, and Asia.

Farewell to Disks: Efficient Processing of Obstinate Data

How we can use STL containers, iterators, and algorithms to access disk-based data without performing any system calls

Diomidis Spinellis

Diomidis Spinellis has written the two award-winning "Open Source Perspective" books: "Code Reading" and "Code Quality" as well as dozens of scientific papers. He is a member of the IEEE Software editorial board, authoring the regular "Tools of the T

Generic Programming with C++ 0x

C++Ox provides several features for the use and implementation of generic components. Although the flagship feature (concepts) was withdrawn, others still remain. This presentation describes some of the new features. In particular it covers lambda functions, the new function declaration syntax, automatically deduced types, variadic templates, and initializer lists.

Dietmar Kuehl

Dietmar Kuhl is a senior software developer at Bloomberg L.P. working on estimating future power use and carbon emissions. Before joining Bloomberg's energy team he worked on high throughput systems feeding exchange data into Bloomberg's internal sys

C++ for Marine Streamer Positioning and Navigation

This session will look at how to use C++ in resource constrained embedded devices for marine seismic acquisition systems. Taking a peek behind the C++ curtain, this talk will cover building your own gcc cross compile toolchain, hardware and runtime initialization, C++ on a diet, and building testable embedded systems.

Mike Long

Mike Long is a software engineer with 7 years experience building large-scale embedded systems for the Oilfield Services industry. His passions include software craftsmanship, embedded Linux, building testable systems, Scotch Whisky and Italian pizza

Simple Software - Regain Control through Decremental Development

Developing Software using the latest complex technology is cool. Software evolution by adding features and fixing bugs can be a burden. Both lead to brittle, buggy, overly complex and poorly performing software solutions. The value of Simplicity of a software solution is often neglected by many software people today. Making software simpler increases its value, because of lower maintenance burden and easier extendability. This talk explains what "simple" software means and how to approach it with "Decremental Development" even for existing (unnecessarily) complicated software.

Peter Sommerlad

Peter Sommerlad is professor and head of Institute for Software at HSR Rapperswil. Peter is co-author of Pattern-oriented Software Architecture Vol.1 and Security Patterns. His long-term goal is to make software simpler by Decremental Development: Re

Software Naturalism - Form and Function in Untamed Code Bases

In the software development industry, we spend a lot of time talking about good design and not nearly enough about design as it is practiced normally. Every code base bears the mark of thousands of micro and macro code design decisions. In the end these decisions give code bases form and the form that they culminate in is rarely what we call "good" or effective design. In this session, Michael Feathers will review empirical research concerning long-lived code bases, describe the common forms that code often falls into over a period of time, and lead a discussion about how we might alter our notions of goodness in design in response to the bare facts about how our actions give code shape.

Michael C. Feathers

Michael Feathers is the founder and Director of R7K Research & Conveyance, a company specializing in software and organization design.

The Art of Productive Lazyness

Learn about the art of productive laziness with The Lazy Project Manager; understanding what is meant by the 'productive lazy' approach to Projects (and life) and learn how to apply these lessons 'to be twice as productive and still leave the office early'. The session will cover the definition of productive laziness, the science behind the theory (yes there really is some), and will share some personal learning experiences that led to the creation of 'The Lazy Project Manager'. In addition the audience will be led through the three key project stages, one of which the 'lazy' project manager works very hard in and the second they should be in the comfortable position of enjoying the 'comfy chair' safe in the knowledge that the project is well under control.

Peter Taylor

Peter is a dynamic and commercially astute professional who has achieved notable success in Project Management; currently as head of a PMO at Siemens Industry Software Limited a supplier of global product lifecycle management solutions.

Oxford Barceló Hotel

Oxford Barceló Hotel

Godstow Road, Oxfordshire, Oxford, OX2 8AL, GB


View details, travel and nearby hotels

To discuss sponsorship opportunities please contact the team:

Overview

ACCU Conference is the the annual conference of the Association of C and C++ Users, which takes place in Oxford in April every year. The conference digs deep into software development, software architecture and programming culture and programming practices.

Programme

Advanced Simplicity

Giles Colborne, Author of Simple and Usable: web mobile and interaction design talks about the challenges of designing for a mainstream audience and why consumers are far more demanding than experts.

Giles Colborne

Giles Colborne is author of Simple and Usable Web Mobile and Interaction Designpublished by New Riders in September 2010. He has been working in usability and user centred design since 1991.

Move Semantics,Perfect Forwarding, and Rvalue references

This session explains what move semantics is, how it affects program performance, and how programmers can control it. It also examines another new C++0x feature, perfect forwarding, because effective use of move semantics takes advantage of it.

Scott Meyers

Scott Meyers is one of the world's foremost authorities on C++. He wrote the best-selling Effective C++ series (Effective C++, More Effective C++, and Effective STL) and recently published training materials on C++0x and on using C++ in embedded syst

Defensive Programming Done Right

In this talk, we begin by reviewing the basic concepts of Design-By-Contract (DbC), and what we mean by the term "Defensive Programming" (DP). We then explore our overall approach to institutionalizing defensive programming in robust reusable library software such that each application can conveniently specify both the runtime budget and also the specific action to be taken.

John Lakos

John Lakos, author of "Large Scale C++ Software Design.", serves at Bloomberg LP in New York City as a senior architect and mentor for C++ Software Development world-wide.

On Our Ability To Do Much

Michael Feathers is an active member of the Agile/XP community. As a contribution to this community, he developed and maintains the CPPUnit — an open source C++ port of the JUnit testing framework. He is a member of the ACM and IEEE. He regularly speaks at software conferences around the world and has been the acting chair for the Codefest event at the last three OOPSLA conferences.

Michael C. Feathers

Michael Feathers is the founder and Director of R7K Research & Conveyance, a company specializing in software and organization design.

Optimizing for Happiness

The way traditional businesses approach the management and organization of creative, intellectual workers is wrong. By throwing away everything that blocks productivity (meetings, deadlines, managers, titles, strict vacation policies, etc) and treating your employees as the responsible adults that they are, potential can be unlocked and employee happiness and retention can be increased.

Tom Preston-Werner

Tom Preston-Werner is a cofounder of GitHub, the social coding phenomenon that has captured the imaginations of hackers around the globe.

Mastering Git Basics

This talk focuses on mastering the commands that comprise 90% of the functionality in Git you use on a day-to-day basis, including installing Git on your favorite platform. Next up is creating local repositories, staging/adding files, making commits, and viewing history. From there you'll learn to share your repositories with others via GitHub, fetch and merge changes that others make, and resolve conflicts.

Tom Preston-Werner

Tom Preston-Werner is a cofounder of GitHub, the social coding phenomenon that has captured the imaginations of hackers around the globe.

Some objects are more equal than others - the many meanings of equality, value and identity

We look at the slippery concepts of equality, value and identity in programming and discuss what pitfalls there are in using them. This is important in e.g. database persistence and reliable unit tests, and is a 'key' issue when you are working with associative collections.

Roger Orr

I have over 20 years experience in IT, using a variety of languages and platforms and have experienced working for a number of different companies over the years. In 1989 I became a contract computer programmer and have successfully managed to remain

Steve Love

Steve Love is a contractor who likes the idea of making shiny new C# applications talk to old grotty C++ ones. He'd prefer to be working on the shiny new stuff, but currently gets to do old grotty legacy C++.

CPU Caches and Why You Care

This session provides a wide-ranging overview of your CPU caches, how they operate, and how that affects high-level decisions on things like data structures and traversal strategies. Both single- and multi-threaded execution are considered.

Scott Meyers

Scott Meyers is one of the world's foremost authorities on C++. He wrote the best-selling Effective C++ series (Effective C++, More Effective C++, and Effective STL) and recently published training materials on C++0x and on using C++ in embedded syst

Good Enough is the enemy of the Good

We spend too much of our working lives coping with inadequate systems on inappropriate kit. We are reassured that this is acceptable because we must "deliver value" and not be "perfectionist". This is just wrong. We've seen teams that have achieved orders of magnitude more effectiveness than their neighbours, not by cutting corners or superhuman effort but by "getting it right".

Nat Pryce

Nat Pryce is a co-author of Growing Object­-Oriented Software Guided by Tests. An early adopter of XP, he has written or contributed to several open source libraries and tools that support TDD and was one of the founding organizers of the London XP Day conference.

Steve Freeman

Steve was a pioneer of Agile software development in the UK, he has built applications for banks, ISPs, financial data providers, and specialist software companies. He has given training courses in Europe, America, and Asia.

Farewell to Disks: Efficient Processing of Obstinate Data

How we can use STL containers, iterators, and algorithms to access disk-based data without performing any system calls

Diomidis Spinellis

Diomidis Spinellis has written the two award-winning "Open Source Perspective" books: "Code Reading" and "Code Quality" as well as dozens of scientific papers. He is a member of the IEEE Software editorial board, authoring the regular "Tools of the T

Generic Programming with C++ 0x

C++Ox provides several features for the use and implementation of generic components. Although the flagship feature (concepts) was withdrawn, others still remain. This presentation describes some of the new features. In particular it covers lambda functions, the new function declaration syntax, automatically deduced types, variadic templates, and initializer lists.

Dietmar Kuehl

Dietmar Kuhl is a senior software developer at Bloomberg L.P. working on estimating future power use and carbon emissions. Before joining Bloomberg's energy team he worked on high throughput systems feeding exchange data into Bloomberg's internal sys

C++ for Marine Streamer Positioning and Navigation

This session will look at how to use C++ in resource constrained embedded devices for marine seismic acquisition systems. Taking a peek behind the C++ curtain, this talk will cover building your own gcc cross compile toolchain, hardware and runtime initialization, C++ on a diet, and building testable embedded systems.

Mike Long

Mike Long is a software engineer with 7 years experience building large-scale embedded systems for the Oilfield Services industry. His passions include software craftsmanship, embedded Linux, building testable systems, Scotch Whisky and Italian pizza

Simple Software - Regain Control through Decremental Development

Developing Software using the latest complex technology is cool. Software evolution by adding features and fixing bugs can be a burden. Both lead to brittle, buggy, overly complex and poorly performing software solutions. The value of Simplicity of a software solution is often neglected by many software people today. Making software simpler increases its value, because of lower maintenance burden and easier extendability. This talk explains what "simple" software means and how to approach it with "Decremental Development" even for existing (unnecessarily) complicated software.

Peter Sommerlad

Peter Sommerlad is professor and head of Institute for Software at HSR Rapperswil. Peter is co-author of Pattern-oriented Software Architecture Vol.1 and Security Patterns. His long-term goal is to make software simpler by Decremental Development: Re

Software Naturalism - Form and Function in Untamed Code Bases

In the software development industry, we spend a lot of time talking about good design and not nearly enough about design as it is practiced normally. Every code base bears the mark of thousands of micro and macro code design decisions. In the end these decisions give code bases form and the form that they culminate in is rarely what we call "good" or effective design. In this session, Michael Feathers will review empirical research concerning long-lived code bases, describe the common forms that code often falls into over a period of time, and lead a discussion about how we might alter our notions of goodness in design in response to the bare facts about how our actions give code shape.

Michael C. Feathers

Michael Feathers is the founder and Director of R7K Research & Conveyance, a company specializing in software and organization design.

The Art of Productive Lazyness

Learn about the art of productive laziness with The Lazy Project Manager; understanding what is meant by the 'productive lazy' approach to Projects (and life) and learn how to apply these lessons 'to be twice as productive and still leave the office early'. The session will cover the definition of productive laziness, the science behind the theory (yes there really is some), and will share some personal learning experiences that led to the creation of 'The Lazy Project Manager'. In addition the audience will be led through the three key project stages, one of which the 'lazy' project manager works very hard in and the second they should be in the comfortable position of enjoying the 'comfy chair' safe in the knowledge that the project is well under control.

Peter Taylor

Peter is a dynamic and commercially astute professional who has achieved notable success in Project Management; currently as head of a PMO at Siemens Industry Software Limited a supplier of global product lifecycle management solutions.

Venue

Oxford Barceló Hotel

Oxford Barceló Hotel

Godstow Road, Oxfordshire, Oxford, OX2 8AL, GB


View details, travel and nearby hotels
Sponsors

To discuss sponsorship opportunities please contact the team:

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