Wednesday, 9th May at CodeNode, London

This meetup was organised by LRUG: London Ruby User Group in May 2018

Don't miss this month's London Ruby User Group!

On writing <%= code %>

Writing code in high-level programming languages began in the 1950s. In contrast, writing goes back more than 5000 years. So, what can we learn from people who study writing? This talk explores concepts from three books about writing and applies them to coding.

Elliott Hilaire

Programmer • Cyclist • Photographer (Aussie in London) I write Ruby and Elixir at Square Enix.

An Introduction to Event Sourcing

Event sourcing is a recently developed design pattern to build applications that are domain centric and easy to extend. The pattern is based on the usage of a persistent event log which substitutes the more classical relational database model for Rails applications. Such event log can then be used for extending your application in all sort of creative ways. For example, by synchronizing data between your microservices, trigger side effects without cluttering your models or controllers, or build data views optimized for your query needs. In this talk, I'll present the basic ideas, some of the tradeoffs and challenges you might find and how you could start experimenting with it.

Read up about Event Sourcing here

Alfredo Motta

Software engineer with expertise in startup environments and leading great teams. I value the customer over the technology, data and scientific experimentation over intuitions, enjoy the learning over being too serious.

Software Development – a view from the Boardroom

Chances are you are building software for a business to use or sell, or both. It’s likely that there is a board of directors involved making decisions that affect you and your software. This talk aims to give you a personal insight into what it’s like to be a CTO on a startup’s board in the hope that it gives you another perspective on ‘the business’ and helps you become a more rounded developer.

Alan Buxton

Alan has been working in the tech space for over 20 years. During this time, he has risen to the heady heights of CTO in a number of startups, including one that was sold to a FTSE listed business and another that he has helped grow from zero to employing about 70 people.

Thanks to our sponsors

Attending Members

Overview

Don't miss this month's London Ruby User Group!

On writing <%= code %>

Writing code in high-level programming languages began in the 1950s. In contrast, writing goes back more than 5000 years. So, what can we learn from people who study writing? This talk explores concepts from three books about writing and applies them to coding.

Elliott Hilaire

Programmer • Cyclist • Photographer (Aussie in London) I write Ruby and Elixir at Square Enix.

An Introduction to Event Sourcing

Event sourcing is a recently developed design pattern to build applications that are domain centric and easy to extend. The pattern is based on the usage of a persistent event log which substitutes the more classical relational database model for Rails applications. Such event log can then be used for extending your application in all sort of creative ways. For example, by synchronizing data between your microservices, trigger side effects without cluttering your models or controllers, or build data views optimized for your query needs. In this talk, I'll present the basic ideas, some of the tradeoffs and challenges you might find and how you could start experimenting with it.

Read up about Event Sourcing here

Alfredo Motta

Software engineer with expertise in startup environments and leading great teams. I value the customer over the technology, data and scientific experimentation over intuitions, enjoy the learning over being too serious.

Software Development – a view from the Boardroom

Chances are you are building software for a business to use or sell, or both. It’s likely that there is a board of directors involved making decisions that affect you and your software. This talk aims to give you a personal insight into what it’s like to be a CTO on a startup’s board in the hope that it gives you another perspective on ‘the business’ and helps you become a more rounded developer.

Alan Buxton

Alan has been working in the tech space for over 20 years. During this time, he has risen to the heady heights of CTO in a number of startups, including one that was sold to a FTSE listed business and another that he has helped grow from zero to employing about 70 people.

Thanks to our sponsors

Who's coming?

Attending Members