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Meet up

Keynote by Naoki Takezoe on Revisit Dependency Injection in Scala and Introduction to Airframe

FREE: Register Now

Monday, 25th November at CodeNode, London

This meetup is organised by Scala Matters Starts at 6:30 PM.

At this month's Scala Matters, Naoki Takezoe will be joining us all the way from Japan to share his keynote on Dependency Injection and how it can improve maintainability and testability of your applications. Don't miss it!

Programme

Come down to CodeNode to learn from the best, share your ideas and join our vibrant community! Be sure to sign-in early to grab a drink and meet other attendees in a casual, relaxed setting.

18:30-19:00 Sign-in and get settled

19:00-19:45 Naoki's presentation

19:45-20:00 Q&A

Revisit Dependency Injection in Scala and Introduction to Airframe

Dependency Injection (DI) is a common design pattern in software programming. In general, DI offers a way to improve maintainability and testability of your applications by isolating component implementation and it clarifies the responsibility of components.

While DI is very common in Java, it also can be applied to Scala. For example, Play offers DI based on Google Guice which is a Java-based DI container. Also, you can use Scala native DI containers and you can even implement DI using only Scala language features as Cake Pattern or Reader Monad.

Airframe is one of Scala native DI containers. It's not only DI container, but also provides general building blocks for Scala applications like logging, data conversion, configuration, etc. You can assemble these building blocks for our applications using DI.

In this talk, Naoki would like to present the available options of DI in Scala, and then introduce Airframe and how you can benefit from amazing features of Airframe with useful design pattern in the real-world applications.

Naoki Takezoe

Naoki works for Arm Treasure Data in Japan. He has over 8 years Scala experience, and author of some books and articles about Scala in Japanese. The latest work is the Japanese translation of "Scala Puzzlers". Creator of GitBucket / Committer of Scalatra and Apache PredictionIO

Thanks to our sponsors

Overview

At this month's Scala Matters, Naoki Takezoe will be joining us all the way from Japan to share his keynote on Dependency Injection and how it can improve maintainability and testability of your applications. Don't miss it!

Programme

Come down to CodeNode to learn from the best, share your ideas and join our vibrant community! Be sure to sign-in early to grab a drink and meet other attendees in a casual, relaxed setting.

18:30-19:00 Sign-in and get settled

19:00-19:45 Naoki's presentation

19:45-20:00 Q&A

Revisit Dependency Injection in Scala and Introduction to Airframe

Dependency Injection (DI) is a common design pattern in software programming. In general, DI offers a way to improve maintainability and testability of your applications by isolating component implementation and it clarifies the responsibility of components.

While DI is very common in Java, it also can be applied to Scala. For example, Play offers DI based on Google Guice which is a Java-based DI container. Also, you can use Scala native DI containers and you can even implement DI using only Scala language features as Cake Pattern or Reader Monad.

Airframe is one of Scala native DI containers. It's not only DI container, but also provides general building blocks for Scala applications like logging, data conversion, configuration, etc. You can assemble these building blocks for our applications using DI.

In this talk, Naoki would like to present the available options of DI in Scala, and then introduce Airframe and how you can benefit from amazing features of Airframe with useful design pattern in the real-world applications.

Naoki Takezoe

Naoki works for Arm Treasure Data in Japan. He has over 8 years Scala experience, and author of some books and articles about Scala in Japanese. The latest work is the Japanese translation of "Scala Puzzlers". Creator of GitBucket / Committer of Scalatra and Apache PredictionIO

Thanks to our sponsors

Who's coming?