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Meet up

On Replacing Callbacks with Core.Async and on Markov Chains

Tuesday, 4th February at Skills Matter, London

This meetup was organised by The London Clojure Community in February 2014

The London Clojure Community will gather at Skills Matter on February 4th for talks on Clojure's core async and markovian opinions.

How replacing callbacks with core.async can make even robots get emotional

A lot of the attention on core.async has focussed on its use for web front-ends with clojurescript. This talk will present a clojure application running on the JVM that demonstrates how a 3rd-party framework can be adapted to work with a core.async application in order to control a NAO humanoid robot.

Clojure's core.async provides a way to write code in a more sequential style that helps make the interaction between multiple events clearer.

One of the issues with callback based programming is the need to coordinate mutable state among multiple callback handlers. Clojure's core.async provides a way to write code in a more sequential style that helps make the interaction between multiple events clearer.

This talk will briefly describe Communicating Sequential Processes (the theoretical foundation on which core.async and other languages such as go and occam are based) before giving an overview of core.async itself.

Dave Snowdon

By day, a mild-mannered programmer working on Virtual Desktop Infrastructure at VMware. By night, when not asleep, plans world domination by social emotional robots powered by python and clojure. Before he was virtualised Dave worked for Xerox Research in France and, back in the mists of time, developed one of the first distributed multi-user virtual reality environments as part of his PhD work at Manchester.

Markovian Opinions

Incensed by the latest opinionated news article, but too busy to leave a comment? Say it with a Markov Chain! In this talk Tom O'Brien presents the basic idea of Markov Chains and how they can be used to generate humorous (and sometimes deeply insightful) comments.

Tom O'Brien

Tom recently left a career in academia to play with computers for a living, and now works for Likely, a Clojure-powered start-up in East London, trying to dig for insights in social media data.

Attending Members

Overview

The London Clojure Community will gather at Skills Matter on February 4th for talks on Clojure's core async and markovian opinions.

How replacing callbacks with core.async can make even robots get emotional

A lot of the attention on core.async has focussed on its use for web front-ends with clojurescript. This talk will present a clojure application running on the JVM that demonstrates how a 3rd-party framework can be adapted to work with a core.async application in order to control a NAO humanoid robot.

Clojure's core.async provides a way to write code in a more sequential style that helps make the interaction between multiple events clearer.

One of the issues with callback based programming is the need to coordinate mutable state among multiple callback handlers. Clojure's core.async provides a way to write code in a more sequential style that helps make the interaction between multiple events clearer.

This talk will briefly describe Communicating Sequential Processes (the theoretical foundation on which core.async and other languages such as go and occam are based) before giving an overview of core.async itself.

Dave Snowdon

By day, a mild-mannered programmer working on Virtual Desktop Infrastructure at VMware. By night, when not asleep, plans world domination by social emotional robots powered by python and clojure. Before he was virtualised Dave worked for Xerox Research in France and, back in the mists of time, developed one of the first distributed multi-user virtual reality environments as part of his PhD work at Manchester.

Markovian Opinions

Incensed by the latest opinionated news article, but too busy to leave a comment? Say it with a Markov Chain! In this talk Tom O'Brien presents the basic idea of Markov Chains and how they can be used to generate humorous (and sometimes deeply insightful) comments.

Tom O'Brien

Tom recently left a career in academia to play with computers for a living, and now works for Likely, a Clojure-powered start-up in East London, trying to dig for insights in social media data.

Who's coming?

Attending Members