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Meet up

Domain-Driven Design with Python

Tuesday, 1st April at Skills Matter, London

This meetup was organised by Skills Matter In The Brain in April 2014

Domain-Driven Design with Python

How do you statically model an ever changing world? In this presentation we’ll look at the reality of doing DDD with Python (though many of the lessons extend to any dynamic language.) We’ll explore when and how dynamic language solutions are most appropriate for domain models, and discusses the trade-offs between flexibility, maintainability and performance in doing so. The talk is illustrated with experiences drawn from building industrial domain models in Python in the energy sector to support high performance computing applications.

Domain Driven Design (DDD) advocates the codification of “the real world” into a domain model, which is in turn realized as a software system around which valuable services can be constructed. The development of these domain models is a flowing conversation between domain experts, software developers, and other stakeholders, and it can involve constant discovery and many course changes. Likewise, as business and physical domains evolve, our requirements, models, and implementations must follow if they are to remain relevant. Dynamic languages such as Python are a great match for the dynamism of the real world. It is perhaps surprising then, that for much of the decade since its inception, DDD has manifested its results in rigid relational database schemas, object relational mappers pushed to their limits, and inflexible object models in statically typed languages such as Java or C#.

Austin Bingham

I am a founding director of Sixty North, a software consulting, training, and application development company. A native of Texas, in 2008 I moved to Stavanger, Norway where I helped develop industry-leading oil reservoir modeling software in C++ and Python.

Robert Smallshire

Robert Smallshire is a founding director of Sixty North, a software product and consulting business in Norway . Robert has worked in senior architecture and technical management roles for several software companies providing tools in the energy sector

Attending Members

Overview

Domain-Driven Design with Python

How do you statically model an ever changing world? In this presentation we’ll look at the reality of doing DDD with Python (though many of the lessons extend to any dynamic language.) We’ll explore when and how dynamic language solutions are most appropriate for domain models, and discusses the trade-offs between flexibility, maintainability and performance in doing so. The talk is illustrated with experiences drawn from building industrial domain models in Python in the energy sector to support high performance computing applications.

Domain Driven Design (DDD) advocates the codification of “the real world” into a domain model, which is in turn realized as a software system around which valuable services can be constructed. The development of these domain models is a flowing conversation between domain experts, software developers, and other stakeholders, and it can involve constant discovery and many course changes. Likewise, as business and physical domains evolve, our requirements, models, and implementations must follow if they are to remain relevant. Dynamic languages such as Python are a great match for the dynamism of the real world. It is perhaps surprising then, that for much of the decade since its inception, DDD has manifested its results in rigid relational database schemas, object relational mappers pushed to their limits, and inflexible object models in statically typed languages such as Java or C#.

Austin Bingham

I am a founding director of Sixty North, a software consulting, training, and application development company. A native of Texas, in 2008 I moved to Stavanger, Norway where I helped develop industry-leading oil reservoir modeling software in C++ and Python.

Robert Smallshire

Robert Smallshire is a founding director of Sixty North, a software product and consulting business in Norway . Robert has worked in senior architecture and technical management roles for several software companies providing tools in the energy sector

Who's coming?

Attending Members