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Meet up

Robots, Haskell & Hedgefunds

Tuesday, 6th May at Skills Matter, London

This meetup is run by The London Clojure Community. Starts at 6:30 PM.

Want to Explore a robot control DSL? Or would you like to take a closer look at Haskell, a cousin of Clojure? Join London Clojure for three talks which will be walking you through topics like DSL and Haskell, leaving you a better Clojure programmer.

A robot control DSL in clojure

Describing the motions of a robot with many degrees of freedom (joints) can be quite tedious. One approach is to represent the value of each joint on a time-lime (similar to a Flash animation). This approach has the disadvantage the the resulting animations are entirely static and cannot react to changes in the conditions of robot. Such animations also are awkward to use from non-graphical programs written in languages such as python and clojure.

Another approach is to use the robot's API to generate the animation. This has the advantage of being able to reach to the robot's current circumstances and integrates well with the rest of a textual program but is hard to read.

In this talk I'll outline (and solicit feedback on) a small DSL written in clojure that aims to make it possible to generate animations in a more readable way. I'll also show a graphical tool that makes generating code in this DSL simple.

Dave Snowdon

By day, a mild-mannered programmer working on Virtual Desktop Infrastructure at VMware. By night, when not asleep, plans world domination by social emotional robots powered by python and clojure. Before he was virtualised Dave worked for Xerox Research in France and, back in the mists of time, developed one of the first distributed multi-user virtual reality environments as part of his PhD work at Manchester.

Haskell for Clojurists

Now that you've found your perfect language, why would you even care about other languages? Actually, a very large part of what's made Clojure so great is the community's eagerness to go out and seek new ideas and bring them back. You'll be surprised how many Clojure core libraries were actually Not Invented Here: core.async, core.logic, core.typed and core.match to name some of the more obvious ones. And for Clojure to retain its competitive edge, it's imperative that we keep this healthy interest in the whole field of computer science going--as opposed to going tribal over our own splendidness while progress only comes when somebody manages to sneak it in the back door, like we're some kind of Node developers.

Which is why Bodil wanted to show you another of her favourite languages: Haskell, a close cousin to Clojure.

Watch this SkillsCast recording of a talk by Bodil Stokke, where she shares many crucial ideas like immutable data structures and a strong focus on pure functions.

Bodil explains how they diverge in their approaches to metaprogramming (Clojure, as we know, employs macros for ultimate power, whereas Haskell's approach is through a remarkably powerful type system) and than asks "Why would you prefer one over the other?"

Why indeed; that's what she then examines, and whether or not you decide to start using Haskell like a category theorist after this talk, we can guarantee you a brush with Haskell will make you a better Clojure programmer.

Bodil Stokke

Bodil is a compulsive conference speaker in the fields of functional programming and internets technologies, and is a co-organiser of multiple developer conferences in Scandinavia and the UK, mostly because she’s still learning how to stop.

Running a hedge fund on Clojure

A case study of a commodity hedge fund making the unusual choice of not only building their own infrastructure but doing so primarily in Clojure. I will be presenting our road to Clojure, how it came to shape our business infrastructure, what we use it for and some lessons learnt in the process and where we're going next.

Patrik Sundberg

A commodity trader who happens to be a lifelong programmer with a great interest in utilizing technology to build a better business and become a better trader. His last pure developer job was around 10 years ago, but that hasn't stopped him from making it over to Clojure via an unusual path of an in-house language, Ruby and Smalltalk.

Attending Members

Overview

Want to Explore a robot control DSL? Or would you like to take a closer look at Haskell, a cousin of Clojure? Join London Clojure for three talks which will be walking you through topics like DSL and Haskell, leaving you a better Clojure programmer.

A robot control DSL in clojure

Describing the motions of a robot with many degrees of freedom (joints) can be quite tedious. One approach is to represent the value of each joint on a time-lime (similar to a Flash animation). This approach has the disadvantage the the resulting animations are entirely static and cannot react to changes in the conditions of robot. Such animations also are awkward to use from non-graphical programs written in languages such as python and clojure.

Another approach is to use the robot's API to generate the animation. This has the advantage of being able to reach to the robot's current circumstances and integrates well with the rest of a textual program but is hard to read.

In this talk I'll outline (and solicit feedback on) a small DSL written in clojure that aims to make it possible to generate animations in a more readable way. I'll also show a graphical tool that makes generating code in this DSL simple.

Dave Snowdon

By day, a mild-mannered programmer working on Virtual Desktop Infrastructure at VMware. By night, when not asleep, plans world domination by social emotional robots powered by python and clojure. Before he was virtualised Dave worked for Xerox Research in France and, back in the mists of time, developed one of the first distributed multi-user virtual reality environments as part of his PhD work at Manchester.

Haskell for Clojurists

Now that you've found your perfect language, why would you even care about other languages? Actually, a very large part of what's made Clojure so great is the community's eagerness to go out and seek new ideas and bring them back. You'll be surprised how many Clojure core libraries were actually Not Invented Here: core.async, core.logic, core.typed and core.match to name some of the more obvious ones. And for Clojure to retain its competitive edge, it's imperative that we keep this healthy interest in the whole field of computer science going--as opposed to going tribal over our own splendidness while progress only comes when somebody manages to sneak it in the back door, like we're some kind of Node developers.

Which is why Bodil wanted to show you another of her favourite languages: Haskell, a close cousin to Clojure.

Watch this SkillsCast recording of a talk by Bodil Stokke, where she shares many crucial ideas like immutable data structures and a strong focus on pure functions.

Bodil explains how they diverge in their approaches to metaprogramming (Clojure, as we know, employs macros for ultimate power, whereas Haskell's approach is through a remarkably powerful type system) and than asks "Why would you prefer one over the other?"

Why indeed; that's what she then examines, and whether or not you decide to start using Haskell like a category theorist after this talk, we can guarantee you a brush with Haskell will make you a better Clojure programmer.

Bodil Stokke

Bodil is a compulsive conference speaker in the fields of functional programming and internets technologies, and is a co-organiser of multiple developer conferences in Scandinavia and the UK, mostly because she’s still learning how to stop.

Running a hedge fund on Clojure

A case study of a commodity hedge fund making the unusual choice of not only building their own infrastructure but doing so primarily in Clojure. I will be presenting our road to Clojure, how it came to shape our business infrastructure, what we use it for and some lessons learnt in the process and where we're going next.

Patrik Sundberg

A commodity trader who happens to be a lifelong programmer with a great interest in utilizing technology to build a better business and become a better trader. His last pure developer job was around 10 years ago, but that hasn't stopped him from making it over to Clojure via an unusual path of an in-house language, Ruby and Smalltalk.

Who's coming?

Attending Members