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Meet up

Performance and Predictability

Tuesday, 29th April at Skills Matter, London

This meetup was organised by LJC: London Java Community in April 2014

Performance and Predictability

Would you like to discover why access patterns are important? Or what kind of speed you can gain with them? Join LJC for an evening with Richard Warburton discussing how you can write simple high level code which works well with these kind of patterns.

These days fast code needs to operate in harmony with its environment. At the deepest level this means working well with hardware: RAM, disks and SSDs. A unifying theme is treating memory access patterns in a uniform and predictable that is sympathetic to the underlying hardware. For example writing to and reading from RAM and Hard Disks can be significantly sped up by operating sequentially on the device, rather than randomly accessing the data.

Richard Warburton

Richard Warburton is an empirical technologist, solver of deep-dive technical problems and author of 'Java 8 Lambdas: Pragmatic Functional Programming'. He has worked as a developer in varied areas including Statistical Analytics, Static Analysis, Compilers and Networking. He is a leader in the London Java Community and runs OpenJDK Hackdays. Richard is also a known conference speaker, having talked at JavaOne, Devoxx, JFokus, DevoxxUK, Geecon, JAX London and Codemotion. Richard has obtained a PhD in Computer Science from The University of Warwick.

Attending Members

Overview

Performance and Predictability

Would you like to discover why access patterns are important? Or what kind of speed you can gain with them? Join LJC for an evening with Richard Warburton discussing how you can write simple high level code which works well with these kind of patterns.

These days fast code needs to operate in harmony with its environment. At the deepest level this means working well with hardware: RAM, disks and SSDs. A unifying theme is treating memory access patterns in a uniform and predictable that is sympathetic to the underlying hardware. For example writing to and reading from RAM and Hard Disks can be significantly sped up by operating sequentially on the device, rather than randomly accessing the data.

Richard Warburton

Richard Warburton is an empirical technologist, solver of deep-dive technical problems and author of 'Java 8 Lambdas: Pragmatic Functional Programming'. He has worked as a developer in varied areas including Statistical Analytics, Static Analysis, Compilers and Networking. He is a leader in the London Java Community and runs OpenJDK Hackdays. Richard is also a known conference speaker, having talked at JavaOne, Devoxx, JFokus, DevoxxUK, Geecon, JAX London and Codemotion. Richard has obtained a PhD in Computer Science from The University of Warwick.

Who's coming?

Attending Members