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Meet up

Learning to Code, How to win developers and Deprecating ActiveResource

Monday, 12th May at Skills Matter, London

This meetup is run by LRUG: London Ruby User Group. Starts at 6:30 PM.

Want to take a closer look into ActiveResource? Or understand the frustrations and triumphs to learning code in Ruby? The London Ruby User Group will be joined by three experts, who will use their own experiences, to run through the ups and downs of ActiveResource and coding in Ruby.

Learning to Code

Angela will be giving us a lightning talk and will be about her adventures, frustrations and triumphs in learning to code and specifically in Ruby.

Angela Ebirim has been attending the Funding Circle Code Craft course

Angela Ebirim

Tech Entrepreneur, Ruby on Rails software engineer and triathlete-in-training

How to win developers and influence designers

Adam will look at a few points that'll help us to work better, together.

In 1936, Dale Carnegie wrote the book “How to win friends and influence people." You may have heard of it. But what can this book, and others, teach us about working as part of a software team today? Quite a lot, actually.

Adam Rogers

Adam Rogers is a program writer for Mint Digital, who loves ruby!

Deprecating ActiveResource: Alternative Approaches for Internal Rails Services

Ruby on Rails has always been optimized for a single monolithic application architecture. But as applications grow, it has become more and more common for architects to seek out ways to break their monolithic Rails apps into self-contained services. For years the most natural answer of how to hook up one Rails app to another’s API has been to use ActiveResource, a core Rails plugin that provides an ActiveRecord-like interface to an external service.

The allure of such a simple interface to a network service is undeniable, but the downsides not nearly as obvious. Many have built Rails apps relying on ActiveResource only to feel significant unforeseen pain down the line.

This talk provides a case study of an early adopter of ActiveResource during the Rails 1.2 era, the pain that it led to, and the eventual replacement of ActiveResource with a bespoke private gem that provides a similar, but more robust interface.

Gabe Da Silveira

Web is a passion of Gabe's, has been been building sites since 1995 and is the co-founder and tech lead at MUBI. He writes about back and front end programming, user interface and graphic design, server administration, developer tools, and technical politics.

Attending Members

Overview

Want to take a closer look into ActiveResource? Or understand the frustrations and triumphs to learning code in Ruby? The London Ruby User Group will be joined by three experts, who will use their own experiences, to run through the ups and downs of ActiveResource and coding in Ruby.

Learning to Code

Angela will be giving us a lightning talk and will be about her adventures, frustrations and triumphs in learning to code and specifically in Ruby.

Angela Ebirim has been attending the Funding Circle Code Craft course

Angela Ebirim

Tech Entrepreneur, Ruby on Rails software engineer and triathlete-in-training

How to win developers and influence designers

Adam will look at a few points that'll help us to work better, together.

In 1936, Dale Carnegie wrote the book “How to win friends and influence people." You may have heard of it. But what can this book, and others, teach us about working as part of a software team today? Quite a lot, actually.

Adam Rogers

Adam Rogers is a program writer for Mint Digital, who loves ruby!

Deprecating ActiveResource: Alternative Approaches for Internal Rails Services

Ruby on Rails has always been optimized for a single monolithic application architecture. But as applications grow, it has become more and more common for architects to seek out ways to break their monolithic Rails apps into self-contained services. For years the most natural answer of how to hook up one Rails app to another’s API has been to use ActiveResource, a core Rails plugin that provides an ActiveRecord-like interface to an external service.

The allure of such a simple interface to a network service is undeniable, but the downsides not nearly as obvious. Many have built Rails apps relying on ActiveResource only to feel significant unforeseen pain down the line.

This talk provides a case study of an early adopter of ActiveResource during the Rails 1.2 era, the pain that it led to, and the eventual replacement of ActiveResource with a bespoke private gem that provides a similar, but more robust interface.

Gabe Da Silveira

Web is a passion of Gabe's, has been been building sites since 1995 and is the co-founder and tech lead at MUBI. He writes about back and front end programming, user interface and graphic design, server administration, developer tools, and technical politics.

Who's coming?

Attending Members