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Meet up

How to Name Things & a Swiss Army Knife for Readable Tests

Thursday, 18th September at Skills Matter, London

This meetup is run by London Software Craftsmanship Community. Starts at 6:30 PM.

This month we welcome author and multiple conference speaker Peter Hilton to give a talk on how developers can benefit from the untapped resource that is literature. We also hear from software craftsman Adam Kosiński, who will speak about fine tuning how we build tests.

How to Name Things: the solution to the hardest problem in programming

Developers can get better at their craft by learning from the great writers who mastered theirs. Writing software isn’t the same as writing a novel, but there are parallels. Besides, advice from writers is better because writers have been struggling with their craft for many centuries, not just a few decades. It’s better-written as well. This talk shares great writers’ best advice for coders: Stephen King on refactoring, Anne Rice on development hardware, Hemingway on modelling with personas, and Neil Gaiman on everything.

Peter Hilton

Peter Hilton is a software developer, writer, speaker, trainer, and amateur musician. His professional interests are business process management, web application development, functional design, agile software development and documentation. Peter currently consults for Signavio in Berlin, remotely from Rotterdam where he has lived since January 2000. Peter regularly presents at developer conferences and provides the occasional training course.

A swiss army knife for readable tests

By now hopefully most of the developers know tests are worth writing. Unfortunately, sometimes their quality leaves a lot to be desired. Tests produced are tightly coupled, testing wrong things with wrong set of assertions.

There are many discussions addressing the questions like "What to test" and "How to test". But there is one equally important - "How to write test someone else can read". While there is no tool on the world that would do the former for you, the latter can be vastly improved with right set of techniques, tricks and libraries. If we are committing to writing tests, we might as well get the most of it.

That is what this talk will be about: ideas and patterns to produce clean, readable and developer-friendly tests. We will look deep into technical details, some of which include: patterns for building your test objects, prettifying test output or defining descriptive assertions.

Adam Kosiński

Adam is a software developer at PayPoint, journeyman on objective, functional, mobile and any other code worth writing. Keenly interested in principles behind programming and curious why people do what they do and write code they write.

Attending Members

Overview

This month we welcome author and multiple conference speaker Peter Hilton to give a talk on how developers can benefit from the untapped resource that is literature. We also hear from software craftsman Adam Kosiński, who will speak about fine tuning how we build tests.

How to Name Things: the solution to the hardest problem in programming

Developers can get better at their craft by learning from the great writers who mastered theirs. Writing software isn’t the same as writing a novel, but there are parallels. Besides, advice from writers is better because writers have been struggling with their craft for many centuries, not just a few decades. It’s better-written as well. This talk shares great writers’ best advice for coders: Stephen King on refactoring, Anne Rice on development hardware, Hemingway on modelling with personas, and Neil Gaiman on everything.

Peter Hilton

Peter Hilton is a software developer, writer, speaker, trainer, and amateur musician. His professional interests are business process management, web application development, functional design, agile software development and documentation. Peter currently consults for Signavio in Berlin, remotely from Rotterdam where he has lived since January 2000. Peter regularly presents at developer conferences and provides the occasional training course.

A swiss army knife for readable tests

By now hopefully most of the developers know tests are worth writing. Unfortunately, sometimes their quality leaves a lot to be desired. Tests produced are tightly coupled, testing wrong things with wrong set of assertions.

There are many discussions addressing the questions like "What to test" and "How to test". But there is one equally important - "How to write test someone else can read". While there is no tool on the world that would do the former for you, the latter can be vastly improved with right set of techniques, tricks and libraries. If we are committing to writing tests, we might as well get the most of it.

That is what this talk will be about: ideas and patterns to produce clean, readable and developer-friendly tests. We will look deep into technical details, some of which include: patterns for building your test objects, prettifying test output or defining descriptive assertions.

Adam Kosiński

Adam is a software developer at PayPoint, journeyman on objective, functional, mobile and any other code worth writing. Keenly interested in principles behind programming and curious why people do what they do and write code they write.

Who's coming?

Attending Members