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Meet up

LDNUG April 2017 - Alex Brown and Dylan Beattie

Tuesday, 11th April at CodeNode, London

This meetup is run by LDNUG: London .NET User Group. Starts at 6:30 PM.

Come join Alex Brown and Dylan Beattie at this month's LDNUG meetup! Alex will be talking about mashing monoliths into manageable modules with Mediatr, and Dylan will talk about the Pursuit of APIness. Don't miss it!

Dylan Beattie: The Pursuit of APIness - The Secret to Happy Code

We spend our lives working with systems created by other people. From the UI on our phones to the cloud infrastructure that runs so much of the modern internet, these interactions are fundamental to our experience of technology - as engineers, as developers, as users - and user experiences are viral. Great user experiences lead to happy, productive people; bad experiences lead to frustration, inefficiency and misery.

Whether we realise it or not, when we create software, we are creating user experiences. People are going to interact with our code. Maybe those people are end users; maybe they're the other developers on your team. Maybe they're the mobile app team who are working with your API, or the engineers who are on call the night something goes wrong. These may be radically different use cases, but there's one powerful principle that works across all these scenarios and more. In this talk, we'll draw on ideas and insight from user experience, API design, psychology and education to show how you can incorporate this principle, known as discoverability, into every layer of your application. We'll look at some real-world systems, and we'll discuss how discoverability works with different interaction paradigms. Because, whether you're building databases, class libraries, hypermedia APIs or mobile apps, sooner or later somebody else is going to work with your code - and when they do, wouldn't it be great if they went away afterwards with a smile on their face?

Dylan Beattie

Dylan Beattie is a developer based in London, where he works as the tech lead at Spotlight, developing software for the theatre and casting industry. He wrote his first web page in 1994. Three years later, he found out what the Web actually was, and promptly abandoned a career in mathematics because programming looked way more fun and had at least as many brackets. He's been building Web apps on Microsoft technology since ASP was part of the Windows NT 4 Option Pack, and he was writing server-side domain models in JavaScript way before it was cool. He even once ran code in JScript.NET.

Alex Brown: Mashing monoliths into manageable modules, with Mediatr

In this talk, Alex shows us how to progress from the traditional repository / service layered architecture into a Command Query Separated structure and benefit from smaller, testable bits of code in your application. We'll take a look at what a typical monolith looks like - you've probably got some in your codebase already. Then we'll talk about how we could improve this, using CQS, facilitated by Mediatr. Finally, we'll take an existing application, which uses a typical repository / service architecture, and begin to break this out into commands and queries, and see immediate reward.

Alex Brown

Alex Brown is a C# developer with a strong interest in writing as little (tested) code as possible to get the job done - done done. He's spent the last 4 years of his 12 year career as a contractor, working on some interesting and challenging projects, both green and brown field. He's currently working at Brightstarr, building a deployable intranet solution, utilising Hangfire, SignalR, Azure and all that other good stuff. He's online at alexjamesbrown.com and on Twitter as @alexjamesbrown

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Attending Members

Overview

Come join Alex Brown and Dylan Beattie at this month's LDNUG meetup! Alex will be talking about mashing monoliths into manageable modules with Mediatr, and Dylan will talk about the Pursuit of APIness. Don't miss it!

Dylan Beattie: The Pursuit of APIness - The Secret to Happy Code

We spend our lives working with systems created by other people. From the UI on our phones to the cloud infrastructure that runs so much of the modern internet, these interactions are fundamental to our experience of technology - as engineers, as developers, as users - and user experiences are viral. Great user experiences lead to happy, productive people; bad experiences lead to frustration, inefficiency and misery.

Whether we realise it or not, when we create software, we are creating user experiences. People are going to interact with our code. Maybe those people are end users; maybe they're the other developers on your team. Maybe they're the mobile app team who are working with your API, or the engineers who are on call the night something goes wrong. These may be radically different use cases, but there's one powerful principle that works across all these scenarios and more. In this talk, we'll draw on ideas and insight from user experience, API design, psychology and education to show how you can incorporate this principle, known as discoverability, into every layer of your application. We'll look at some real-world systems, and we'll discuss how discoverability works with different interaction paradigms. Because, whether you're building databases, class libraries, hypermedia APIs or mobile apps, sooner or later somebody else is going to work with your code - and when they do, wouldn't it be great if they went away afterwards with a smile on their face?

Dylan Beattie

Dylan Beattie is a developer based in London, where he works as the tech lead at Spotlight, developing software for the theatre and casting industry. He wrote his first web page in 1994. Three years later, he found out what the Web actually was, and promptly abandoned a career in mathematics because programming looked way more fun and had at least as many brackets. He's been building Web apps on Microsoft technology since ASP was part of the Windows NT 4 Option Pack, and he was writing server-side domain models in JavaScript way before it was cool. He even once ran code in JScript.NET.

Alex Brown: Mashing monoliths into manageable modules, with Mediatr

In this talk, Alex shows us how to progress from the traditional repository / service layered architecture into a Command Query Separated structure and benefit from smaller, testable bits of code in your application. We'll take a look at what a typical monolith looks like - you've probably got some in your codebase already. Then we'll talk about how we could improve this, using CQS, facilitated by Mediatr. Finally, we'll take an existing application, which uses a typical repository / service architecture, and begin to break this out into commands and queries, and see immediate reward.

Alex Brown

Alex Brown is a C# developer with a strong interest in writing as little (tested) code as possible to get the job done - done done. He's spent the last 4 years of his 12 year career as a contractor, working on some interesting and challenging projects, both green and brown field. He's currently working at Brightstarr, building a deployable intranet solution, utilising Hangfire, SignalR, Azure and all that other good stuff. He's online at alexjamesbrown.com and on Twitter as @alexjamesbrown

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