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SkillsCast

Reproducible Scientific Workflows in Haskell

11th October 2018 in London at CodeNode

There are 38 other SkillsCasts available from Haskell eXchange 2018

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In-silico analysis now makes up a large part of the scientific process but is often surprisingly haphazard. If you've worked in the space, you'll be familiar with the process of running repeated iterations on experiments, duplicating processing and generating innumerable variants on outputs, only to have to backtrack and discover how the final results were reached.

Experiments run on one machine may not repeat on another, or even when run another time on the same architecture. During this session, you will learn about this and other problems encountered building scientific pipelines, and how Haskell is well positioned to tackle them. Nicholas will introduce funflow, a Haskell workflow tool developed by Tweag, and how it's being used in production to develop genome analysis pipelines.

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Reproducible Scientific Workflows in Haskell

Nicholas Clarke

Nicholas is currently a software engineer at Tweag I/O, working on a range of projects from biotech to blockchains. In past lives, he led the development of a cluster management system for Seagate and worked in bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute.

SkillsCast

Please log in to watch this conference skillscast.

Https s3.amazonaws.com prod.tracker2 resource 41088130 skillsmatter conference skillscast o9nohu

In-silico analysis now makes up a large part of the scientific process but is often surprisingly haphazard. If you've worked in the space, you'll be familiar with the process of running repeated iterations on experiments, duplicating processing and generating innumerable variants on outputs, only to have to backtrack and discover how the final results were reached.

Experiments run on one machine may not repeat on another, or even when run another time on the same architecture. During this session, you will learn about this and other problems encountered building scientific pipelines, and how Haskell is well positioned to tackle them. Nicholas will introduce funflow, a Haskell workflow tool developed by Tweag, and how it's being used in production to develop genome analysis pipelines.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE:

Thanks to our sponsors

About the Speaker

Reproducible Scientific Workflows in Haskell

Nicholas Clarke

Nicholas is currently a software engineer at Tweag I/O, working on a range of projects from biotech to blockchains. In past lives, he led the development of a cluster management system for Seagate and worked in bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute.

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