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SkillsCast

Sociotechnical Architecture: Aligning Teams and Software for Continuous Delivery

5th November 2018 in London at CodeNode

There are 28 other SkillsCasts available from µCon London 2018 - The Microservices Conference

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A loosely coupled software architecture and an organisational structure to match is one of the biggest predictors of continuous delivery performance (Forsgren et. al.). Accordingly, if you want to optimise end-to-end value creation and delivery in your organisation you need to you need to adopt a sociotechnical mindset. When teams are designed without consideration of the software architecture, dependencies will arise in code that inhibit teams from delivering high value at speed. Worse, organisational dysfunctions will multiply. Teams will start to blame each other. Managers will try to grab power instead of optimising business outcomes. And employee motivation will drop dramatically. Fortunately, by adopting a sociotechnical mindset you can align your teams and software systems to minimise dependencies and maximise product delivery. The sociotechnical mindset involves combining knowledge of multiple perspectives: social dynamics, the business domain, the business model, technology constraints, and more in order to design and continuously evolve an effective sociotechnical architecture.

In this talk you will learn about domain-driven design in order to understand how to model software systems with few dependencies. You’ll also learn about organisation design patterns addressing the social needs of people building software systems. And you’ll see lots of examples based on years of practical experience.

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Thanks to our sponsors

Sociotechnical Architecture: Aligning Teams and Software for Continuous Delivery

Nick Tune

Nick is technical leader and consultant who works with a range of organisations in a variety of domains. He specialises in modelling and designing sociotechnical systems - finding boundaries in software and organising teams to optimise speed of delivery, team autonomy, and business outcomes.

SkillsCast

Please log in to watch this conference skillscast.

737287099 640

A loosely coupled software architecture and an organisational structure to match is one of the biggest predictors of continuous delivery performance (Forsgren et. al.). Accordingly, if you want to optimise end-to-end value creation and delivery in your organisation you need to you need to adopt a sociotechnical mindset. When teams are designed without consideration of the software architecture, dependencies will arise in code that inhibit teams from delivering high value at speed. Worse, organisational dysfunctions will multiply. Teams will start to blame each other. Managers will try to grab power instead of optimising business outcomes. And employee motivation will drop dramatically. Fortunately, by adopting a sociotechnical mindset you can align your teams and software systems to minimise dependencies and maximise product delivery. The sociotechnical mindset involves combining knowledge of multiple perspectives: social dynamics, the business domain, the business model, technology constraints, and more in order to design and continuously evolve an effective sociotechnical architecture.

In this talk you will learn about domain-driven design in order to understand how to model software systems with few dependencies. You’ll also learn about organisation design patterns addressing the social needs of people building software systems. And you’ll see lots of examples based on years of practical experience.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE:

Thanks to our sponsors

About the Speaker

Sociotechnical Architecture: Aligning Teams and Software for Continuous Delivery

Nick Tune

Nick is technical leader and consultant who works with a range of organisations in a variety of domains. He specialises in modelling and designing sociotechnical systems - finding boundaries in software and organising teams to optimise speed of delivery, team autonomy, and business outcomes.

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