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SkillsCast

Simulating Charles Babbage's Analytical Engine in F#

4th April 2019 in London at CodeNode

There are 27 other SkillsCasts available from F# eXchange 2019

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In the 1840s Charles Babbage proposed, but never built, an entirely mechanical, Turing-complete computer that he called the Analytical Engine. The designs were sufficiently complete that Ada, Countess of Lovelace (among others), was able to design 'programs' for it; this also means that we can model its behaviour with a reasonable degree of accuracy. This talk describes some of the architectural features of the machine. Together with John, you will also model its behaviour in F# to the point where you can run some simple programs on the virtual machine.

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Simulating Charles Babbage's Analytical Engine in F#

John Stovin

John has been a software developer for longer than he cares to remember. He learned to program on a Commodore PET back in the 1970s. 2019.

SkillsCast

Please log in to watch this conference skillscast.

Https s3.amazonaws.com prod.tracker2 resource 41088130 skillsmatter conference skillscast o9nohu

In the 1840s Charles Babbage proposed, but never built, an entirely mechanical, Turing-complete computer that he called the Analytical Engine. The designs were sufficiently complete that Ada, Countess of Lovelace (among others), was able to design 'programs' for it; this also means that we can model its behaviour with a reasonable degree of accuracy. This talk describes some of the architectural features of the machine. Together with John, you will also model its behaviour in F# to the point where you can run some simple programs on the virtual machine.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE:

Thanks to our sponsors

About the Speaker

Simulating Charles Babbage's Analytical Engine in F#

John Stovin

John has been a software developer for longer than he cares to remember. He learned to program on a Commodore PET back in the 1970s. 2019.

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