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SkillsCast

From Capabilities to Services: Modelling for Business-IT Alignment

29th May 2019 in London at Business Design Centre

There are 52 other SkillsCasts available from µCon London 2019 - The Conference on Microservices, DDD & Software Architecture

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The IT industry seems to go through cycles of re-discovery of lost knowledge with every new generation of developers, which probably is not so odd considering the exponential growth of practitioners. Allegedly half of the programmers today are juniors, which means many of them have yet to encounter the challenges faced decades ago.

For example, many run the risk of falling into the trap of modelling services around domain entities, risking ending up with a distributed monolith with its devastating coupling, fragility, and cognitive nightmare. Luckily, there are shoulders to stand on to get out of the quagmire, or even better, prevent getting on to that slippery slope in the first place.

Being conscious of fallacies like those of distributed computing and anti-patterns like functional decomposition and entity services are all well and good, and necessary heuristics to good service design, but one often crave more concrete guidance. There are many great techniques to consider, like context mapping, user story mapping, event storming, and value chain analysis, but in this talk Trond will focus on the lost art of business capability modelling. The thesis is that a technique that was relevant in the pre-computing era might be just as useful and relevant when splitting monoliths into a mesh of autonomous (micro)services.

Maybe they could even help dentify subdomains, contexts, and organisational structures; in effect constructing a sociotechnical system?

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From Capabilities to Services: Modelling for Business-IT Alignment

Trond Hjorteland

Trond is an IT architect from the consulting firm Scienta and has many years experience with large, complex, and business critical systems, primarily as a developer and architect on middleware and backend systems. His main interest in the last decade has been service-orientation, domain-driven design, event driven architectures, and sociotechnical systems, working in industries like telecom, media, TV, and public sector. Mantra: You have to become the business in able to design solutions that truly fit their needs.their needs.

SkillsCast

Please log in to watch this conference skillscast.

Https s3.amazonaws.com prod.tracker2 resource 41088130 skillsmatter conference skillscast o9nohu

The IT industry seems to go through cycles of re-discovery of lost knowledge with every new generation of developers, which probably is not so odd considering the exponential growth of practitioners. Allegedly half of the programmers today are juniors, which means many of them have yet to encounter the challenges faced decades ago.

For example, many run the risk of falling into the trap of modelling services around domain entities, risking ending up with a distributed monolith with its devastating coupling, fragility, and cognitive nightmare. Luckily, there are shoulders to stand on to get out of the quagmire, or even better, prevent getting on to that slippery slope in the first place.

Being conscious of fallacies like those of distributed computing and anti-patterns like functional decomposition and entity services are all well and good, and necessary heuristics to good service design, but one often crave more concrete guidance. There are many great techniques to consider, like context mapping, user story mapping, event storming, and value chain analysis, but in this talk Trond will focus on the lost art of business capability modelling. The thesis is that a technique that was relevant in the pre-computing era might be just as useful and relevant when splitting monoliths into a mesh of autonomous (micro)services.

Maybe they could even help dentify subdomains, contexts, and organisational structures; in effect constructing a sociotechnical system?

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE:

Thanks to our sponsors

About the Speaker

From Capabilities to Services: Modelling for Business-IT Alignment

Trond Hjorteland

Trond is an IT architect from the consulting firm Scienta and has many years experience with large, complex, and business critical systems, primarily as a developer and architect on middleware and backend systems. His main interest in the last decade has been service-orientation, domain-driven design, event driven architectures, and sociotechnical systems, working in industries like telecom, media, TV, and public sector. Mantra: You have to become the business in able to design solutions that truly fit their needs.their needs.

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