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SkillsCast

Is the Future Functional?

12th October 2011 in London at Skills Matter

This SkillsCast was filmed at Is the Future Functional?

In partnership with QCon and Skills Matter, Rob Harrop will give a talk on Functional Programming, why he thinks it is likely that functional will the predominant paradigm in the near future, and explore what the impact of such a move would be.

In partnership with QCon and Skills Matter, Rob Harrop will give a talk on "Is the Future Functional?"

Recently we've seen a resurgence of mainstream functional programming. Languages such as Clojure, F# and Scala are bringing functional programming techniques back into everyday usage. Is this an indicator that the future of programming is going to be functional?

In this talk Rob Harrop explains why he thinks it is likely that functional will the predominant paradigm in the near future and explore what the impact of such a move would be.

We'll discuss the landscape of functional languages, reasons why the move to functional will benefit us and what changes we'll have to make to the way we work.

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Is the Future Functional?

Rob Harrop

As CTO at Skipjaq, Rob Harrop leads a team working on the cutting edge of machine-driven performance optimisation. When he’s not thinking about how best to tune the myriad workloads encountered by Skipjaq customers, he’s thinking hard about how to pass the optimisation burden on to machines that learn. Rob is well known as a co-founder of SpringSource, the software company behind the wildly-successful Spring Framework. At SpringSource he was a core contributor to the Spring Framework and led the team that built dm Server (now Eclipse Virgo). Prior to SpringSource, Rob was (at the age of 19) co-founder and CTO at Cake Solutions, a boutique consultancy in Manchester, UK. A respected author, speaker and teacher, Rob writes and talks frequently about large-scale systems, cloud architecture and functional programming. His published works include the highly-popular Spring Framework reference “Pro Spring”.