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SkillsCast

Don't you trust me? (a technical approach to building trust and consensus)

4th April 2013 in London at Skills Matter

There are 15 other SkillsCasts available from CukeUp! 2013

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Seb Rose discusses an approach that he has been experimenting with using Cucumber's tagged hooks to control the amount of application stack that a scenario exercises.

In many legacy organisations there's a tension between the desires of the three amigos

  • business stakeholders can't validate assumptions unless they're written in business domain terms
  • testers would ideally test everything end to end (vertically)
  • developers respond that the testing pyramid encourages us to have more unit tests than integration or end-to-end tests

It is often recommended that some tests that start off as scenarios get pushed 'down' into unit tests to keep the execution time under control and constrain the maintenance burden of the feature suite. The trouble with this is that even if the business folk and the testers trusted the developer's unit tests implicitly (which they often don't ;-) there's still the issue of visibility. We no longer have one complete, generally consumable, source living documentation.

Additionally, we don't want to pollute our scenarios with details about our step definition implementation (such as whether we're exercising an isolated component or entire system end-2-end). Which is exactly what we'd like to do in some circumstances to minimise the runtime of our feature suite.

An approach that he has been experimenting with uses Cucumber's tagged hooks to control the amount of application stack that a scenario exercises. This lets us tailor our execution context depending on the runtime of the feature suite and the amount of trust the team has to spare. In the limit, this allows us (where it makes sense) to expose some of our unit tests as scenarios - keeping our living documentation complete.

The cost, of course, is added complexity.

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Don't you trust me? (a technical approach to building trust and consensus)

Seb Rose

Consultant, coach, trainer, analyst and developer for over 30 years. Seb has been involved in the full development lifecycle with experience that ranges from Architecture to Support, from BASIC to Ruby. He’s a partner in Cucumber Limited, who help teams adopt and refine their agile practices, with a particular focus on collaboration and automated testing.

SkillsCast

Please log in to watch this conference skillscast.

Https s3.amazonaws.com prod.tracker2 resource 41088130 skillsmatter conference skillscast o9nohu

Seb Rose discusses an approach that he has been experimenting with using Cucumber's tagged hooks to control the amount of application stack that a scenario exercises.

In many legacy organisations there's a tension between the desires of the three amigos

  • business stakeholders can't validate assumptions unless they're written in business domain terms
  • testers would ideally test everything end to end (vertically)
  • developers respond that the testing pyramid encourages us to have more unit tests than integration or end-to-end tests

It is often recommended that some tests that start off as scenarios get pushed 'down' into unit tests to keep the execution time under control and constrain the maintenance burden of the feature suite. The trouble with this is that even if the business folk and the testers trusted the developer's unit tests implicitly (which they often don't ;-) there's still the issue of visibility. We no longer have one complete, generally consumable, source living documentation.

Additionally, we don't want to pollute our scenarios with details about our step definition implementation (such as whether we're exercising an isolated component or entire system end-2-end). Which is exactly what we'd like to do in some circumstances to minimise the runtime of our feature suite.

An approach that he has been experimenting with uses Cucumber's tagged hooks to control the amount of application stack that a scenario exercises. This lets us tailor our execution context depending on the runtime of the feature suite and the amount of trust the team has to spare. In the limit, this allows us (where it makes sense) to expose some of our unit tests as scenarios - keeping our living documentation complete.

The cost, of course, is added complexity.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE:

Thanks to our sponsors

About the Speaker

Don't you trust me? (a technical approach to building trust and consensus)

Seb Rose

Consultant, coach, trainer, analyst and developer for over 30 years. Seb has been involved in the full development lifecycle with experience that ranges from Architecture to Support, from BASIC to Ruby. He’s a partner in Cucumber Limited, who help teams adopt and refine their agile practices, with a particular focus on collaboration and automated testing.

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