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SkillsCast

Six impossible things before breakfast

20th September 2013 in New York City at DUMBO Loft

This SkillsCast was filmed at Agile Testing & BDD eXchange NYC 2013

SkillsCast coming soon.

Would you like to learn how Bank of America transformed its organization from a culture of command and control, to one where empowerment and learning rules? How a group of former managers reinvented their roles to servants, rather than masters? How other managers were compelled to move out their corner offices to join delivery teams?

Recently I’ve been seeing lots of things that don’t happen in real life. A Managing Director at Bank of America abandoning decades of organizational “best practices” and recreating his organization by letting people organize their own teams, and, if that weren’t unusual enough, the teams choose their own coach. This is, of course, impossible.

A group of former managers reinventing their role as servants rather than masters. This too, is impossible.

Other managers who had been working at the bank for over twenty years abandoning their lofty titles and moving out of their corner offices to join software delivery teams. This clearly is impossible.

The final straw was seeing a Java developer happily learning COBOL from a mainframe programmer. This, at the very least, is rather improbable. Come and hear what else has been happening before breakfast. It's all mad as a hatter.

This is a talk on how to transform an organization from a culture of command and control, to one where empowerment and learning rules.

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Thanks to our sponsors

Six impossible things before breakfast

Gordon Weir

Gordon Weir has more than twenty years of experience in the software business. After being voted Young Engineer of the Year in New Zealand in 1998, he left his position in engineering with the navy to work for a software house in New Jersey, USA. After a year he left for the UK to pursue his interest in working on large-scale software delivery, joining PwC Management Consultancy, followed by IBM, where he worked on numerous integration programs. In 2005 Gordon moved to UBS where he led the delivery of the global clearing and settlement systems for the equities business.

SkillsCast

SkillsCast coming soon.

Would you like to learn how Bank of America transformed its organization from a culture of command and control, to one where empowerment and learning rules? How a group of former managers reinvented their roles to servants, rather than masters? How other managers were compelled to move out their corner offices to join delivery teams?

Recently I’ve been seeing lots of things that don’t happen in real life. A Managing Director at Bank of America abandoning decades of organizational “best practices” and recreating his organization by letting people organize their own teams, and, if that weren’t unusual enough, the teams choose their own coach. This is, of course, impossible.

A group of former managers reinventing their role as servants rather than masters. This too, is impossible.

Other managers who had been working at the bank for over twenty years abandoning their lofty titles and moving out of their corner offices to join software delivery teams. This clearly is impossible.

The final straw was seeing a Java developer happily learning COBOL from a mainframe programmer. This, at the very least, is rather improbable. Come and hear what else has been happening before breakfast. It's all mad as a hatter.

This is a talk on how to transform an organization from a culture of command and control, to one where empowerment and learning rules.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE:

Thanks to our sponsors

About the Speaker

Six impossible things before breakfast

Gordon Weir

Gordon Weir has more than twenty years of experience in the software business. After being voted Young Engineer of the Year in New Zealand in 1998, he left his position in engineering with the navy to work for a software house in New Jersey, USA. After a year he left for the UK to pursue his interest in working on large-scale software delivery, joining PwC Management Consultancy, followed by IBM, where he worked on numerous integration programs. In 2005 Gordon moved to UBS where he led the delivery of the global clearing and settlement systems for the equities business.