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SkillsCast

µKanren: Running the Little Things Backwards

3rd March 2015 in London at Skills Matter

This SkillsCast was filmed at µKanren: Running the Little Things Backwards

SkillsCast coming soon.

Relational programming, or logic programming, is a programming paradigm that exhibits remarkable and powerful properties, to the extent that its implementation seems frightfully daunting to the layman. µKanren is a minimal relational language that seeks to strip the paradigm down to its core, leaving us with a succinct, elegant and above all simple set of primitives on top of which we can rebuild even the most powerful relational constructs.

In this talk, we will explore the µKanren language by implementing it from first principles in a simple functional programming language, going on to demonstrate how you can assemble these simple building blocks into a semblance of its richer parent, miniKanren, and maybe solve a logic puzzle or two to make sure it’s working as advertised.

The µKanren paper, and the original µKanren implementation, were authored by Jason Hemann and Daniel P. Friedman. The paper is available at http://webyrd.net/scheme-2013/papers/HemannMuKanren2013.pdf, and the Scheme implementation at https://github.com/jasonhemann/microKanren.

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µKanren: Running the Little Things Backwards

Bodil Stokke

Bodil works as a computer science researcher for a secretive think tank, and is a world renowned expert in varied fields such as pizza and persistent data structures. Contrary to popular rumour, she only has five fingers on each hand, but is still an Emacs user.

SkillsCast

SkillsCast coming soon.

Relational programming, or logic programming, is a programming paradigm that exhibits remarkable and powerful properties, to the extent that its implementation seems frightfully daunting to the layman. µKanren is a minimal relational language that seeks to strip the paradigm down to its core, leaving us with a succinct, elegant and above all simple set of primitives on top of which we can rebuild even the most powerful relational constructs.

In this talk, we will explore the µKanren language by implementing it from first principles in a simple functional programming language, going on to demonstrate how you can assemble these simple building blocks into a semblance of its richer parent, miniKanren, and maybe solve a logic puzzle or two to make sure it’s working as advertised.

The µKanren paper, and the original µKanren implementation, were authored by Jason Hemann and Daniel P. Friedman. The paper is available at http://webyrd.net/scheme-2013/papers/HemannMuKanren2013.pdf, and the Scheme implementation at https://github.com/jasonhemann/microKanren.

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About the Speaker

µKanren: Running the Little Things Backwards

Bodil Stokke

Bodil works as a computer science researcher for a secretive think tank, and is a world renowned expert in varied fields such as pizza and persistent data structures. Contrary to popular rumour, she only has five fingers on each hand, but is still an Emacs user.