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SkillsCast

Introducing Troy: The schema-safe Cassandra toolkit - Advanced

8th December 2016 in London at Business Design Centre

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Troy is an open source macro-based Cassandra driver, similar to Slick and Quill, provides type-safe & compile-time checking for database queries. Nevertheless, it doesn't impose a DSL to express the queries in Scala. Instead, it allows developers to write plain Cassandra-query-language (CQL) queries within Scala code, complete with schema validation. In addition, it provides cross-validation against the previous versions, ensuring safe and smooth schema migrations.

It is worth noting that Troy doesn't connect to Cassandra during compilation. Instead, the schema is provided as CQL scripts, checked-in within same code base, consisting of plain CREATE TABLE CQL statements. That get's loaded at compile-time into a light-weight Schema engine capable of analysing queries and providing information about column types. Those CQL scripts can be written as increments, by adding new scripts containing ALTER TABLE statement, instead of editing existing scripts. This allows Troy to check backwards and forward compatibility of queries against different versions of the schema. As well as providing tools to write migration scripts.

Currently, Troy uses reflection-based black-box macros. But also has a working proof-of-concept using the new style inline/meta as well.

There will be slides and code, along with live coding examples.

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Introducing Troy: The schema-safe Cassandra toolkit - Advanced

Tamer AbdulRadi

Senior software engineer at Cake Solutions, currently designing and implementing distributed systems using Scala, Akka, Cassandra, Kafka, and DC/OS, while contributing back to open source projects, and creating his own.